Art & Photo lessons Show All Sort By recency

Explore the art and life of one of the most influential Japanese woodblock print artists, Hiratsuka Un’ichi. A pioneer of the early 20th century Japanese Creative Print Movement (sosaku hanga), Hiratsuka is steeped in the ancient Japanese tradition of wood carving and woodblock prints.


Assignment:
6:00
82
610
2
1
Aly

Preserve the memories from an amazing trip with a scrapbook! Whether you visited the the country of your ancestors or spent a week at a nearby beach, preserve the memories and share your experiences by creating a unique scrapbook of your trip. According to Aly, your scrapbook starts even before you depart (so pack a Ziploc bag to collect important bits of paper like maps or photos from your journey). Once you’ve enjoyed your vacation and gathered the pieces, Aly will show you how to make a beautiful scrapbook of your trip.


Assignment:
2:44
1.4K
519
22
75
3 of 8

Painted in 1533, Hans Holbein’s “The Ambassadors” is a double portrait of two French Ambassadors, who were apparently successful in all aspects of life, evidenced by the items they are painted with. But an anamorphic skull in the bottom half of the portrait requires an entirely different perspective to view it, and not the men and their accomplishments. How and why did Holbein incorporate this skull into the painting? Amor Sciendi is here to help explain this metaphorical image.


Assignment:
3:52
509
2.5K
3
13

Raphael’s painting, “The School of Athens” depicts two of the founding fathers of western philosophy, Plato and Aristotle, surrounded by other famed intellectuals from various years and countries, all in a very Roman space. It’s a visually pleasing painting, but what does it mean? What was Raphael’s purpose for creating it? In this art history lesson, learn the meaning behind “The School of Athens,” as well as the physics behind the hallmark of Roman architecture: the arch.


Assignment:
6:22
1.5K
3K
20
38
8 of 8

Pablo Picasso is well known for his unrealistic portraits and figures, but what exactly do his stylistic choices mean? In this art history lesson on “Les Demoiselles d’Avignon,” learn about the culture of 1907, and what a painting of five naked women in a brothel has to do with Einstein. True art is often a commentary on the world in which it is produced—learn why Picasso, despite being an accomplished painter in the traditional sense, chose to paint in his own abstract and angular style.


Assignment:
3:54
241
2.5K
4
8
6 of 8

The Sistine Chapel is one of the most famous pieces of art and architecture in the world, and in the center of Michelangelo’s enormous fresco is “The Creation of Adam,” a visual representation of the story of God creating Adam from the dust of the earth. Michelangelo’s portrayal of both Adam and God reflects the Neo-Platonic values of the time, but perhaps the most interesting interpretation of this painting is that of God’s vehicle being a brain, and the life he is giving Adam, consciousness.


Assignment:
3:35
377
2.2K
15
37
5 of 8

Most likely you are familiar with Botticelli’s painting, “The Birth of Venus”; you may not have known that it was a Botticelli, but chances are you’ve seen the image. But do you know the mythology behind the painting? “The Birth of Venus” tells the story of the Roman goddess of love’s birth from sea foam (foam that was fertilized by Zeus’ castrated genitals—yikes), in both a beautiful, and mathematically genius way. Learn about the Golden Rectangle and what it is doing in this famous painting.


Assignment:
5:40
391
2.5K
3
10
4 of 8

There are about as many interpretations of Piero della Francesca’s painting “The Flagellation of Christ” as there are art historians; and though we may never know who all the figures are or what exactly is being depicted, there is more to this painting than meets the eye. Piero della Francesca was a mathematician, and the composition of this painting is based largely in geometry. This image proves that we don’t have to know everything about a painting to be able to learn from it.


Assignment:
5:34
323
2K
5
8
2 of 8

Michelangelo’s “The Last Judgment” is a stunning Sistine Chapel fresco that depicts the biblical “Second Coming” of Christ, but it also reflects the religious schism of the 16th century, as well as the developments in art and trade (with the prominent bright ultramarine sky—derived from the Afghani lapis lazuli). This art history lesson explains how this painting came to be, and reveals why this work of art, commissioned and approved by the pope, was altered after Michelangelo’s death.


Assignment:
3:57
761
2.1K
5
12

Learn through art and sculpture about how the Lord Ganesha got his elephant head, lost his tusk, and other stories from oral tradition. Lucas Livingston will show you defining artistic characteristics of this Hindu god using sculpture housed at the Chicago Institute of Art and/or used in the Ganesha Chaturthi festival.


Assignment:
8:48
248
636
4
7

You don’t have to use a professional rig to get a cinematic look for your film—in this lesson, learn the common mistakes that lead to a less than professional looking video sequence, and how to get the look that you want! A cinematic aesthetic takes lots of planning, shooting at the right frame rate, and mastering manual settings (you’ll want to turn down the contrast and saturation on your camera, for starters). Done right, no one will know that you aren’t working with professional equipment.


Assignment:
3:18
308
141
1
8
9 of 11

Want to make your movie spooky? Cheerful? Nostalgic? Explore using color correction and gradient in post-production to change the mood of your film. In this lesson, filmmaker Fenchel Janisch teaches you about how working with a three color correction tool can alter the temperature, white balance, or contrast or your DSLR film footage to suggest a specific genre or heighten the intensity of a scene.


Assignment:
2:48
162
89
1
3
7 of 8

While frescos and mosaics depicting religious events may have been popular throughout European history, the Alhambra does not reflect traditional Western thought. An Islamic palace from the period when the Moors ruled Spain, the Alhambra contains no images of God or man. Instead, it is covered in symmetrical and abstract patterns, pointing the viewer to reflect not on the temporal and physical attributes of the divine, but on the eternal beauty of the mind of God.


Assignment:
7:08
360
2K
1
11

If you scrapbook, chances are you have a pretty good stash of paper. Don’t let those resources go to waste—instead, learn how to make a paper kit. In this lesson from Kiwi Lane Designs, Susan shows you how to sort your paper by color and pattern, and how to assemble a kit that contains paper for a background, photo mats, borders, and accessories. Not only will making these paper kits save you money, you’ll also save time by utilizing and organizing the materials you already have.


Assignment:
9:47
8.1K
2.3K
83
186

Think you need an expensive and glamorous location to shoot a good looking music video? Think again! In this cinematography lesson from Tom Antos, learn how to shoot a music video full of contrast, depth, and definition, using a simple tungsten light and a rim light. Get great tips on how to add even more contrast with lights behind the subject, and learn how to add interest with a streak filter! After this tutorial, the only thing you’ll need is an artist to film who is worthy of your talents.


Assignment:
9:10
123
130
0
1
6 of 6

Well aware of your cinematic genius, your talented musician friends have asked you to create an artistic and thought provoking visual counterpart to one of their songs. Naturally, you want this music video to demonstrate your unparalleled creativity and skill—so you decide to shoot their music video in one take! This type of production requires plenty of planning and practice, but learn how to do it, and the end result will have everyone marveling at your abilities and wondering how you did it.


Assignment:
6:34
222
119
3
4
14 of 20

Let's go to the movies... in the movies! In this filmmaking lesson, award-winning cinematographer Tom Antos teaches you how to light and shoot a movie theater scene, simulating the light that comes off of a cinema screen. Real life cinemas are too dark to get a camera exposure, so you can recreate the effect using a 1000-watt light. Learn how make a lighting spin wheel and use red and blue gels to create a flickering effect with changing intensity and color.


Assignment:
5:51
63
957
0
1
6 of 20

Want to film glamorous and well-lit footage? In this filmmaking lesson, award-winning cinematographer Tom Antos teaches you how to construct a low-budget ring light: a light that wraps around your camera to provide uniform light, even shadows, and attractive reflections off of your subject's eyes and lips. To make your ring light you'll need plywood, 40-watt light bulbs and sockets, a dimmer switch, screws, and wire. Ring lights are perfect for commercials, music videos, or fashion shoots.


Assignment:
8:02
117
979
2
3
3 of 20

Getting the right lighting for a shot can make or break a scene, and make your production look either high quality, or extremely low budget. Whether you are shooting indoors or out, learn how to use HMI PAR lights. In this filmmaking lesson, learn why when shooting in direct sunlight you may need to use additional lights, and how to use HMI PAR lights to compensate for a darkly lit indoor shot. Finally, learn how these bright and versatile lights can even be used to supply soft ambient light.


Assignment:
6:11
106
954
0
2
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