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Mixed strategies, pure strategies, Nash equilibria... why can't they all get along? In this lesson from William Spaniel's Game Theory 101 series, learn the rules to determine if a pure strategy is in support of a mixed strategy Nash equilibrium. You’ll work on calculating probability and expected utility, but this time will apply your skills to a 3 by 3 rather than the usual 2 by 2 game.


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You and your best friend are offered free money, and so long as you both choose to accept it in a blind vote, you both get richer! What could go wrong? Learn about the Free Money game theory scenario, and why there's a possible outcome where everyone ends up poorer (but is still a Nash equilibrium). The Free Money game is an exception to the Odd Rule, which states that almost all games have an odd number of equilibria.


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We use fonts every time we type, but do we really understand them? In this first in a series of typography lessons from Yes I'm a Designer, get an introduction to the wonderful world of fonts. You'll learn how to use InDesign to view the full range of glyphs in a font (beyond the characters you're used to seeing on your keyboard), discover how fonts are stored on your computer, and unravel the mystery of unicode.


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Craving a down-home dish without the hassle? Ditch those russets and make some sweet potato fries. Not a huge fan of the sweet starchiness in dishes such as sweet potato pie or candied sweet potatoes? Girls Gone Sporty has a recipe for spicy sweet potato fries that is guaranteed to convert even the most adamant haters. Bake two batches in less than an hour with this tutorial.


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How do you take those black dots on the page and turn them into piano music? First you have to learn how to read music! Web Piano Teacher offers a series of lessons on sight reading music for beginners. Learn the names of notes and their positions on the keyboard. Figure out how to look at sheet music and tell the difference between a treble clef and bass clef. Get your eyes and your fingers in sync and start playing!


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Ever wonder how so much rock ‘n roll can come from one tiny Fender guitar? Check out this lesson on the anatomy of an electric guitar. It’s very similar to that of an acoustic guitar, only with added amplification! You’ll learn the importance of pickups, knobs, switches, and extra electronics. Plug in and shred up and down the neck


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You know about backward induction in game theory, which assumes that all future play will be rational. But what about the opposite technique? In this lesson from William Spaniel's Game Theory 101 series, you'll be introduced to forward induction, which assumes that all past play was rational. Using a version of the Stag Hunt game, learn how Player 2 can look at payoffs and use forward induction to infer Player 1's move.


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In practice, not all players follow the solution suggested by mathematical modeling of game theory scenarios. Why is this the case? In this lesson from William Spaniel's Game Theory 101 series, learn about the three steps for solving a game: (1) making assumptions, (2) doing the math, and (3) reaching conclusions. Discover why bad assumptions can undermine the results of mathematical modeling—revealing why reality all too often doesn't match up with theory.


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You've tackled Game Theory 101, so what's next? William Spaniel gives you a sneak preview of more advanced Game Theory concepts such as repeated games and incomplete information. What the heck is a Bayesian Nash equilibrium? Who gets a better deal in a negotiation, and why? How and when is war inefficient? Why do people vote? All these questions and more can be answered with the magic—um, science—of game theory!


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Rock, Paper... Symmetry? In this lesson from William Spaniel’s Game Theory 101 series, learn about symmetric zero sum games: game theory scenarios in which each player's expected utility at equilibrium must equal zero. William will present a proof of the theorem, and review symmetric games and zero sum games independently. Knowledge of game theory has applications for real-world politics, economics, and everyday life.


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Want to make a fun and colorful alcoholic drink? In this lesson, The Vegetarian Baker teaches you how to infuse Absolut Vodka with jelly beans, making the vodka colorful and sweet. Using mini vodka bottles and jelly beans, you can create a cheerful mini-fridge-sized drink with a kick. It's the perfect way to get a little of your inner child into your adult beverage!


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Tackle the ‘Battle of the Sexes’ game from a new angle and learn to solve for pure and mixed strategy Nash equilibria using variables instead of numbers. This Game Theory 101 lesson explains how to find the expected payoff of certain strategies using the mixed strategy algorithm and probability distributions - even when some factors in the game are unknown. Use the approach covered in this lesson to understand and solve a variety of generalized games.


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Slice into the precarious world of knife-edge equilibria - a kind of game theory equilibrium that exists for a single and exact payoff value. If this value varies in even the slightest way, the game matrix equilibrium is destroyed. Follow along with William Spaniel and his Game Theory 101 lesson as he explores this rare occurrence that is frequently ignored in game theory studies.


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Game theory fans, meet comparative statics. This lesson from William Spaniel's Game Theory 101 series expands on the previous Soccer Penalty Kicks scenario to explore the world of comparative statics. Discover how a game's outputs change as a function of the game's inputs – in this case, a change in the probability of the kicker scoring a goal when he kicks in a certain direction. Learn and practice the four steps to calculating comparative statics.


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Game theory needn't mix you up! In this final lesson of William Spaniel's Game Theory 101 series, learn how to solve game theory scenarios with three possible strategies. Expand the mixed strategy algorithm and apply it to games with more than two strategies. Figure out the mixed strategy Nash equilibrium for a modified version of Rock, Paper, Scissors. Solve for a player's indifference and calculate expected utilities as a function of a given mixed strategy.


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Are you a seasoned guitarist always on the lookout for advice? Or maybe you’re a frustrated beginner? Here’s a small tip that will last a lifetime of guitar playing: curl the last knuckle of each fretting finger. This helps you to strum chords efficiently and hit every necessary note. Check out this lesson to fully comprehend the importance of the curl.


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Why bend over backwards- or bend over at all- to pick up a tennis ball? Lock and Roll tennis teaches you how to perform Rafael Nadal's sweet trick for getting the tennis ball off the ground using just his feet. It's a stylish, hip, and effortless way to retrieve a ball, especially when you're practicing your tennis swings and have a lot of balls to collect!


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Have you ever lost points on a game theory assignment or test because you came to a slightly wrong conclusion? In this installment of his series on Game Theory, William Spaniel reveals one of the most frequent mistakes game theory students make: expressing mixed strategy Nash equilibria as decimals, not fractions. William demonstrates why 1/3 is not the same as .33, supporting his claim that when solving game theory equations, its always safe to stick with fractions.


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Want to learn a programming language that will do a lot of the work for you? Check out Professor Paul Krause's introduction to Ruby on Rails, a highly dynamic and fully object-oriented framework for creating websites. In this first of a series of lessons on Ruby, hear the history of Ruby on Rails and why it's useful, and find out how Ruby can cope with problems that would leave Javascript reeling.


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