Humanities

Creative Writing Tips to Hook Readers

68 CQ
10 Lessons
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    6 CQ
    1. How to Structure a Story
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This lesson goes beyond the idea that a story merely consists of a beginning, middle, and an end, looking at the five basic elements of the narrative arc.

    This lesson goes beyond the idea that a story merely consists of a beginning, middle, and an end, looking at the five basic elements of the narrative arc.

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    9 CQ
    2. Writing Openings & Point of View
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This lesson looks at ways you can hook your readers with your story's opening lines and explores the advantages and disadvantages of different points of view.

    This lesson looks at ways you can hook your readers with your story's opening lines and explores the advantages and disadvantages of different points of view.

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    6 CQ
    3. Writing in Past vs. Present Tense
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This writing lesson explores the advantages and disadvantages of past tense and present tense, helping determine which tense may work best for your story.

    This writing lesson explores the advantages and disadvantages of past tense and present tense, helping determine which tense may work best for your story.

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    6 CQ
    4. Powering Your Story's Plot
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This creative writing lesson provides tips for using conflict and suspense to inject tension into your story, powering the plot from beginning to end.

    This creative writing lesson provides tips for using conflict and suspense to inject tension into your story, powering the plot from beginning to end.

  • Playing
    7 CQ
    5. How to End a Story
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This lesson explores different types of story endings, providing tips for writing effective endings that both satisfy and surprise your readers.

    This lesson explores different types of story endings, providing tips for writing effective endings that both satisfy and surprise your readers.

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9 Comments
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Michelle Z
You’re terrific. Thank you.
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Ben F
Really great lessons. I very much appreciate the knowledge you’re willing to share!
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Ramon V
You're a great teacher. Thank you for this lesson too!
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Jay T
"If on a Winter's Night a Traveler" by Italo Calvino is an often cited novel written in second person. You might want to talk about close third and omniscient third. Think I'll pick up your example book--it sounds really good.
T. P. Jagger
Thanks for the feedback and the additional 2nd-person POV title. I know this lesson merely scratches the surface of POV, and you're right--it would be good to dig deeper into the various forms of 3rd-person (omniscient v. limited). Thanks again! :)
David W
Bright Lights, Big City by Jay McInerny is also written in 2nd person. It's not a great book, but the POV raises interesting questions. Is the narrator talking to someone else, or is it actually a 1st person narrative told in a very detached fashion?
T. P. Jagger
David, thanks for sharing that 2nd-person title with us!
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David C
Is it possible to write a story from two persons' perspective, while keeping character 1 in first person and character 2 in third person?
T. P. Jagger
Yes, you can definitely use multiple POVs like that. If doing so, you'd likely use chapter breaks when switching the POVs. For example, Ch. 1 might be 1st-person POV for one character then Ch. 2 would switch to the different character via 3rd-person limited POV. Chapters could then toggle back and forth between those two viewpoints. I recently finished reading GOODBYE STRANGER by Rebecca Stead, which uses this approach, but one of the perspectives was 2nd-person POV. It was very interesting!
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