Humanities

Creative Writing Tips to Hook Readers

68 CQ
10 Lessons
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    6 CQ
    1. How to Structure a Story
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This lesson goes beyond the idea that a story merely consists of a beginning, middle, and an end, looking at the five basic elements of the narrative arc.

    This lesson goes beyond the idea that a story merely consists of a beginning, middle, and an end, looking at the five basic elements of the narrative arc.

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    9 CQ
    2. Writing Openings & Point of View
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This lesson looks at ways you can hook your readers with your story's opening lines and explores the advantages and disadvantages of different points of view.

    This lesson looks at ways you can hook your readers with your story's opening lines and explores the advantages and disadvantages of different points of view.

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    6 CQ
    3. Writing in Past vs. Present Tense
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This writing lesson explores the advantages and disadvantages of past tense and present tense, helping determine which tense may work best for your story.

    This writing lesson explores the advantages and disadvantages of past tense and present tense, helping determine which tense may work best for your story.

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    6 CQ
    4. Powering Your Story's Plot
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This creative writing lesson provides tips for using conflict and suspense to inject tension into your story, powering the plot from beginning to end.

    This creative writing lesson provides tips for using conflict and suspense to inject tension into your story, powering the plot from beginning to end.

  • Playing
    7 CQ
    5. How to End a Story
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This lesson explores different types of story endings, providing tips for writing effective endings that both satisfy and surprise your readers.

    This lesson explores different types of story endings, providing tips for writing effective endings that both satisfy and surprise your readers.

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13 Comments
500 characters max
Emily K
Is it okay if the problem isn't clearly presented at the beginning? For example, the girl is being chased by the enemies but doesn't know why until later, and the why is the real problem?
T. P. Jagger
Emily, yes, there's certainly plenty of leeway for how the basic story structure plays out. The example you mention presents multiple layers to a problem, with those layers eventually peeling back until the core problem is revealed. Two points to consider: 1) Typically, by 20-25% of the way into a story, the protagonist's (hero's) mission should be clear. 2) In your example, the problem/mission itself might be that the protagonist must uncover the WHY she's being chased. Happy writing! :)
500 characters max
Carolyn D
Good information- thanks but the audio is dreadful and echoes far too much- making some words blurred and indistinguishable. It sounds like you have your head in a bucket.
500 characters max
Ramon V
Thank you for this lesson. Very helpful.
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Saul C
I loved this thank you :)
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Lindsey E
Very fun, engaging, and informative. I would, however, modify your microphone a bit. It's very distracting to hear every sound your mouth makes when you talk.
T. P. Jagger
Thanks for the feedback, Lindsey!
Lindsey E
:D <3 ANytime
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