Humanities

Creative Writing Tips to Hook Readers

68 CQ
10 Lessons
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    6 CQ
    1. How to Structure a Story
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This lesson goes beyond the idea that a story merely consists of a beginning, middle, and an end, looking at the five basic elements of the narrative arc.

    This lesson goes beyond the idea that a story merely consists of a beginning, middle, and an end, looking at the five basic elements of the narrative arc.

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    9 CQ
    2. Writing Openings & Point of View
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This lesson looks at ways you can hook your readers with your story's opening lines and explores the advantages and disadvantages of different points of view.

    This lesson looks at ways you can hook your readers with your story's opening lines and explores the advantages and disadvantages of different points of view.

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    6 CQ
    3. Writing in Past vs. Present Tense
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This writing lesson explores the advantages and disadvantages of past tense and present tense, helping determine which tense may work best for your story.

    This writing lesson explores the advantages and disadvantages of past tense and present tense, helping determine which tense may work best for your story.

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    6 CQ
    4. Powering Your Story's Plot
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This creative writing lesson provides tips for using conflict and suspense to inject tension into your story, powering the plot from beginning to end.

    This creative writing lesson provides tips for using conflict and suspense to inject tension into your story, powering the plot from beginning to end.

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    7 CQ
    5. How to End a Story
    A lesson with T. P. Jagger
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    This lesson explores different types of story endings, providing tips for writing effective endings that both satisfy and surprise your readers.

    This lesson explores different types of story endings, providing tips for writing effective endings that both satisfy and surprise your readers.

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7 Comments
500 characters max
Alyssa C
Thank you for imparting your knowledge to us. You’re a humble and great teacher!
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AnJella M
I've been writing since I was a kid. Planning out my first novel and gosh am I glad I discovered Curious and your videos. Learning new things with every lesson. Thanks
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Aisha A
I totally understand the use of past and present tense, but for some reason when I'm writing I accidentally switch between the two. Then in revision I confuse myself trying to figure out how to fix it. I hope I'm not the only one this happens to.
T. P. Jagger
Aisha, you're not alone. I've done the same thing! I especially tend to struggle with tense-hopping if I've finished a story in one tense and then start a new story in a different tense. It can take my mind awhile to adjust to the shift. I guess that's what revision is for! :) Also, keep in mind that sometimes a stories use multiple tenses. For example, if I'm writing in present tense, my story is likely to have some flashbacks, at which point there will be a temporary shift to past tense.
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Kendra S
Great lesson... really enjoyed it
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P A
I'm enjoying your lessons but never realized how technical writing is. This is interesting.
T. P. Jagger
I'm glad you're enjoying the lessons! As you learn more about writing and storytelling, it can be a fun exercise to see how the various elements play out in books that you read (or even movies that you watch).
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