844 matching results

  • 7
    48 min
    7-part Microsoft Office course
    Playing
    28 CQ
    Master Lookup Functions in Excel
    A 7-part course with Paula
    View course

    Have some Excel experience, but want to up your Excel formula skill level? This course helps intermediate Excel beginners to carry out complex lookup functions, including lookup formula combinations.

    with Paula

    Have some Excel experience, but want to up your Excel formula skill level? This course helps intermediate Excel beginners to carry out complex lookup functions, including lookup formula combinations.

  • 7
    82 min
    7-part Microsoft Office course
    Playing
    45 CQ
    Getting Started with Excel 2016
    A 7-part course with Trump Excel
    View course

    Excel 2016 offers many features for daily data tracking. In this course, learn how to use major features of Excel 2016 such as formulas, formatting, charting, pivot tables, and more.

    Excel 2016 offers many features for daily data tracking. In this course, learn how to use major features of Excel 2016 such as formulas, formatting, charting, pivot tables, and more.

  • 4
    38 min
    4-part Microsoft Office course
    Playing
    20 CQ
    How to Create Tables & Charts in Excel
    A 4-part course with Subject Money
    View course

    Microsoft Excel is a powerful program that’s perfect for organizing data! In this brief, beginner- to intermediate-level course, learn how to create and edit Excel tables, and format a Gantt Chart.

    Microsoft Excel is a powerful program that’s perfect for organizing data! In this brief, beginner- to intermediate-level course, learn how to create and edit Excel tables, and format a Gantt Chart.

  • 12
    42 min
    12-part Microsoft Office course
    Playing
    28 CQ
    Excel Formulas
    A 12-part course with Trump Excel
    View course

    Excel is a wonderful data organization software—if you know the functions. This comprehensive course from Trump Excel demonstrates how to use common excel functions, from “FIND” to “IF” functions.

    Excel is a wonderful data organization software—if you know the functions. This comprehensive course from Trump Excel demonstrates how to use common excel functions, from “FIND” to “IF” functions.

  • 5
    56 min
    5-part Microsoft Office course
    Playing
    31 CQ
    Using Excel 2013 for Basic Bookkeeping
    A 5-part course with Paula
    View course

    Learn how use Microsoft Excel 2013 for bookkeeping with this course from E-Learning Educators. You'll learn how to enter in daybook data, edit it, as well as sort and analyze it using built-in tools.

    with Paula

    Learn how use Microsoft Excel 2013 for bookkeeping with this course from E-Learning Educators. You'll learn how to enter in daybook data, edit it, as well as sort and analyze it using built-in tools.

  • 6
    47 min
    6-part Microsoft Office course
    Playing
    27 CQ
    How to Plan & Create Excel Spreadsheets
    A 6-part course with Geoff Hudson
    View course

    Want to build an expense-tracking spreadsheet in Excel? Learn how to plan a spreadsheet, analyze data, and display results that are easy to read, and useful for keeping your finances on track!

    Want to build an expense-tracking spreadsheet in Excel? Learn how to plan a spreadsheet, analyze data, and display results that are easy to read, and useful for keeping your finances on track!

  • 6
    21 min
    6-part Microsoft Office course
    Playing
    14 CQ
    Excel 2013 Advanced Data Techniques
    A 6-part course with SONIC Performance Support
    View course

    Want to dive into the best of Excel? In this course, SONIC Performance Support introduces intermediate to advanced data management techniques, from debugging complex formulas to creating web queries.

    Want to dive into the best of Excel? In this course, SONIC Performance Support introduces intermediate to advanced data management techniques, from debugging complex formulas to creating web queries.

  • 10
    45 min
    10-part Microsoft Office course
    Playing
    27 CQ
    How to Create a Gradebook in Excel
    A 10-part course with Todd McLeod
    View course

    With the basic Microsoft Excel knowledge introduced in this course, build a gradebook based on a course syllabus, format and customize data, and use formulas and functions to calculate grades!

    With the basic Microsoft Excel knowledge introduced in this course, build a gradebook based on a course syllabus, format and customize data, and use formulas and functions to calculate grades!

  • 11
    59 min
    11-part Microsoft Office course
    Playing
    34 CQ
    Excel Pivot Table Basics
    An 11-part course with MyExcelOnline
    View course

    In this data processing course, learn the basics of using pivot tables in Excel, from how to create and format a pivot table to how to make a dashboard using slicers and pivot charts.

    In this data processing course, learn the basics of using pivot tables in Excel, from how to create and format a pivot table to how to make a dashboard using slicers and pivot charts.

Lessons Sort By Relevance

Curios

  • FREE
    Work Daily Curio #1166
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Wrapped around Excel’s axle
    A curio with
    View curio

    Spreadsheet “bugs” are a problem for most data-crunching people. But most of them are not world-renowned Harvard economists using their Excel models to justify highly partisan theories. That’s exactly what Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff were doing though. They released a paper that spawned a global movement to reduce national federal debt, only to realize their fundamental conclusions were based on a serious Excel blunder. In essence, they accidentally “hid” five rows in their Excel spreadsheet that contained GDP data from 5 of the 19 nations in their study. Reinhart and Rogoff’s key claim was that when countries reached a gross government debt equal to 90% of their GDP they hit a tipping point which caused annual economic growth to start decreasing every year. The Reinhart-Rogoff paper was music to the ears of “deficit hawks” around the world. It seemed to provide solid proof that national debt could reverse a nation’s growth. Except not. When Reinhart and Rogoff included the missing rows of data, the growth in countries with high government debt jumped to an extremely healthy +2.2% per year. D’oh! The data error was discovered by a graduate student at UMass Amherst whose econ professor had asked students to find a published paper and replicate it. When Herndon couldn’t replicate the same results, he went to his professor, who also failed to replicate the results. So they gathered a team at UMass to assemble a corrected version of the Reinhart-Rogoff paper, and then published it. Reinhart and Rogoff almost immediately responded, admitting the data error. But it was too late. The original Reinhart-Rogoff paper had already been used to support the 2013 US budget created by the Republican majority in the House of Representatives. The study had also already been used by the European Commission to justify major fiscal cuts and “austerity” measures. And Rogoff himself had already gone before a large panel of bipartisan economists warning of catastrophic consequences for the US economy, since it was in a 90% debt situation. Next time they could save time by just using Excel’s “goal seek” feature.

    with

    Spreadsheet “bugs” are a problem for most data-crunching people. But most of them are not world-renowned Harvard economists using their Excel models to justify highly partisan theories. That’s exactly what Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff were doing though. They released a paper that spawned a global movement to reduce national federal debt, only to realize their fundamental conclusions were based on a serious Excel blunder. In essence, they accidentally “hid” five rows in their Excel spreadsheet that contained GDP data from 5 of the 19 nations in their study. Reinhart and Rogoff’s key claim was that when countries reached a gross government debt equal to 90% of their GDP they hit a tipping point which caused annual economic growth to start decreasing every year. The Reinhart-Rogoff paper was music to the ears of “deficit hawks” around the world. It seemed to provide solid proof that national debt could reverse a nation’s growth. Except not. When Reinhart and Rogoff included the missing rows of data, the growth in countries with high government debt jumped to an extremely healthy +2.2% per year. D’oh! The data error was discovered by a graduate student at UMass Amherst whose econ professor had asked students to find a published paper and replicate it. When Herndon couldn’t replicate the same results, he went to his professor, who also failed to replicate the results. So they gathered a team at UMass to assemble a corrected version of the Reinhart-Rogoff paper, and then published it. Reinhart and Rogoff almost immediately responded, admitting the data error. But it was too late. The original Reinhart-Rogoff paper had already been used to support the 2013 US budget created by the Republican majority in the House of Representatives. The study had also already been used by the European Commission to justify major fiscal cuts and “austerity” measures. And Rogoff himself had already gone before a large panel of bipartisan economists warning of catastrophic consequences for the US economy, since it was in a 90% debt situation. Next time they could save time by just using Excel’s “goal seek” feature.

  • FREE
    Work Daily Curio #944
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    More proof Excel is the coolest program ever
    A curio with
    View curio

    Microsoft Excel is one of the most powerful programs on the planet. It can generate complex financial models, run statistical simulations, and graph just about anything. But Tatsuo Horiuchi, a Japanese artist, uses Excel to make art. Using just the AutoShapes function, Horiuchi creates stunning landscapes and portraits that appear to be painted on a canvas. Horiuchi claims he just stumbled upon this new medium as a matter of frugality—he tells reporters he only started using Excel because it was preinstalled on his computer. But it has made him a local celebrity. In 2006, he won an AutoShapes art contest, which apparently is a thing. Not bad for a 73-year old retiree who had never used Excel before. The best part about Horiuchi's art is that you can open the original XLS files on your computer (assuming you have Excel—sorry Google Sheets users) to see how the artwork was created. And Horiuchi isn't the only Excel artist. Detroit-based artist Danielle Aubert turned a daily Excel drawing exercise into a book, 16 Months Worth of Drawings in Microsoft Excel. The mathematics group Think Maths even created an application that turns any photo into pixelated art for Excel. I love nerds!

    with

    Microsoft Excel is one of the most powerful programs on the planet. It can generate complex financial models, run statistical simulations, and graph just about anything. But Tatsuo Horiuchi, a Japanese artist, uses Excel to make art. Using just the AutoShapes function, Horiuchi creates stunning landscapes and portraits that appear to be painted on a canvas. Horiuchi claims he just stumbled upon this new medium as a matter of frugality—he tells reporters he only started using Excel because it was preinstalled on his computer. But it has made him a local celebrity. In 2006, he won an AutoShapes art contest, which apparently is a thing. Not bad for a 73-year old retiree who had never used Excel before. The best part about Horiuchi's art is that you can open the original XLS files on your computer (assuming you have Excel—sorry Google Sheets users) to see how the artwork was created. And Horiuchi isn't the only Excel artist. Detroit-based artist Danielle Aubert turned a daily Excel drawing exercise into a book, 16 Months Worth of Drawings in Microsoft Excel. The mathematics group Think Maths even created an application that turns any photo into pixelated art for Excel. I love nerds!

  • FREE
    Drawing Daily Curio #89
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    A curio with
    View curio

    Joseph Priestley is most famous for discovering oxygen in 1770, but he also made another equally important discovery. He figured out that the congealed sap of an India Gum tree was "excellently adapted to the purpose of wiping from paper the mark of black lead pencil." In fact, it was Priestley's description of the necessary vigorous rubbing action that gave the tree its modern name: the "rubber" tree. It proved to be a vast improvement over the then state-of-the-art eraser technology--old bread that had been de-crusted, moistened and balled up. We promise we're not making any of this up!

    with

    Joseph Priestley is most famous for discovering oxygen in 1770, but he also made another equally important discovery. He figured out that the congealed sap of an India Gum tree was "excellently adapted to the purpose of wiping from paper the mark of black lead pencil." In fact, it was Priestley's description of the necessary vigorous rubbing action that gave the tree its modern name: the "rubber" tree. It proved to be a vast improvement over the then state-of-the-art eraser technology--old bread that had been de-crusted, moistened and balled up. We promise we're not making any of this up!

  • FREE
    Humanities Daily Curio #175
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    A curio with
    View curio

    BEST OF 2013 #7 - Joseph Priestley is most famous for discovering oxygen in 1770, but he also made another equally important discovery. He figured out that the congealed sap of an India Gum tree was "excellently adapted to the purpose of wiping from paper the mark of black lead pencil." In fact, it was Priestley's description of the necessary vigorous rubbing action that gave the tree its modern name: the "rubber" tree. It proved to be a vast improvement over the then state-of-the-art eraser technology--old bread that had been de-crusted, moistened and balled up. We promise we're not making any of this up!

    with

    BEST OF 2013 #7 - Joseph Priestley is most famous for discovering oxygen in 1770, but he also made another equally important discovery. He figured out that the congealed sap of an India Gum tree was "excellently adapted to the purpose of wiping from paper the mark of black lead pencil." In fact, it was Priestley's description of the necessary vigorous rubbing action that gave the tree its modern name: the "rubber" tree. It proved to be a vast improvement over the then state-of-the-art eraser technology--old bread that had been de-crusted, moistened and balled up. We promise we're not making any of this up!

  • FREE
    Mind + Body Daily Curio #405
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Bieber saves more lives
    A curio with
    View curio

    We recently learned how Justin Bieber saved countless lives by sparking a haircut trend that protected millions of teens against skin cancer. This week there was an even more dramatic Bieber lifesaving event. A Russian bear was in the process of mauling fisherman Igor Vorozhbitsyn near a fishing spot in the Republic of Yakutia when Igor's phone rang. The ringtone was set to Bieber’s song “Baby," which his daughter had downloaded as a joke. The bear, whose claws were digging into Igor's face, was so startled that he turned and fled back into the woods. Igor, badly injured, managed to use the phone to call for help... and credits Bieber with saving his life. Putting all kidding aside--well, actually, I'm finding that hard to do, so I'm just going to end it here.

    MORE FROM JUSTIN: Listen up, peeps! Today we are introducing the "Course of the Week." Each Tuesday we'll highlight one of our courses that our Curious learners are raving about. If you enroll before the following Sunday, you'll get $15 of FREE credit put in your account for future learning.

    Up first is Motion Training's Excel Essentials, one of our all-time most popular courses. If you've ever felt stupid when using Excel, or have resigned yourself to "not being a spreadsheet person," then this course will change your life. Remember, enroll before Sunday night and get $15 of Curious Credit FREE. Not bad for a $30 purchase! Click here to get a peek inside the course.
    -- jsk

    with

    We recently learned how Justin Bieber saved countless lives by sparking a haircut trend that protected millions of teens against skin cancer. This week there was an even more dramatic Bieber lifesaving event. A Russian bear was in the process of mauling fisherman Igor Vorozhbitsyn near a fishing spot in the Republic of Yakutia when Igor's phone rang. The ringtone was set to Bieber’s song “Baby," which his daughter had downloaded as a joke. The bear, whose claws were digging into Igor's face, was so startled that he turned and fled back into the woods. Igor, badly injured, managed to use the phone to call for help... and credits Bieber with saving his life. Putting all kidding aside--well, actually, I'm finding that hard to do, so I'm just going to end it here.

    MORE FROM JUSTIN: Listen up, peeps! Today we are introducing the "Course of the Week." Each Tuesday we'll highlight one of our courses that our Curious learners are raving about. If you enroll before the following Sunday, you'll get $15 of FREE credit put in your account for future learning.

    Up first is Motion Training's Excel Essentials, one of our all-time most popular courses. If you've ever felt stupid when using Excel, or have resigned yourself to "not being a spreadsheet person," then this course will change your life. Remember, enroll before Sunday night and get $15 of Curious Credit FREE. Not bad for a $30 purchase! Click here to get a peek inside the course.
    -- jsk

  • FREE
    Biology Daily Curio #575
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Zebra A/C
    A curio with
    View curio

    Do you think you know why zebras have stripes? Well you don't, and neither do evolutionary biologists. They ruled out most popular theories like camouflage years ago. So the explanation for such bold stripes has remained a mystery. But scientists might have made a breakthrough. Researchers recently compared the stripes of zebra populations in 16 regions, from eastern Africa to South Africa. They found the stripe intensity varied by population, with some having bold black and white stripes, and others having lighter and thinner stripes. After regressing the data for 30 different environmental factors, the researchers have concluded that temperature is strongly correlated with striping patterns. Warmer-climate zebras have wider and blacker stripes while zebras living in cooler temperatures have the fewest and faintest stripes. Scientists aren't sure why this correlation exists, but they suspect it has something to do with temperature regulation. Because black and white stripes heat up differently, airflow between the black and white stripes differs, creating a current of air that could be excellent for cooling. So basically they have built in A/C!

    with

    Do you think you know why zebras have stripes? Well you don't, and neither do evolutionary biologists. They ruled out most popular theories like camouflage years ago. So the explanation for such bold stripes has remained a mystery. But scientists might have made a breakthrough. Researchers recently compared the stripes of zebra populations in 16 regions, from eastern Africa to South Africa. They found the stripe intensity varied by population, with some having bold black and white stripes, and others having lighter and thinner stripes. After regressing the data for 30 different environmental factors, the researchers have concluded that temperature is strongly correlated with striping patterns. Warmer-climate zebras have wider and blacker stripes while zebras living in cooler temperatures have the fewest and faintest stripes. Scientists aren't sure why this correlation exists, but they suspect it has something to do with temperature regulation. Because black and white stripes heat up differently, airflow between the black and white stripes differs, creating a current of air that could be excellent for cooling. So basically they have built in A/C!

  • FREE
    College Prep PP&T Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Thing: The first College Board Exam
    A curio with
    View curio

    The prototype for the SAT looks nothing like today's version.  

    We hope you studied your Latin adjective declensions! The College Board administered its first exam this week in 1901, marking the beginning of the end for the absurdly inefficient admissions process of old.  

    Prior to 1900, students had to travel to prospective universities to be evaluated. Universities wrote and administered their own tests, which could more than a week for students to complete—making applications to just one or two schools financially burdensome for everyone involved.  

    In 1885, a school principal raised the issue with the National Education Association so a better process could be devised. After 15 years of planning, the College Board was formed. It hoped to standardize high school curricula, and streamline the college application process to make higher education available to a wider range of applicants.  

    The 1901 test consisted of essays in several topics: English, French, German, Latin, Greek, history, mathematics, chemistry, and physics. Forget about trying to score a perfect 2400, these students were vying for titles: Excellent, Good, Doubtful, Poor, or Very Poor. The test was administered to a mere 973 students in 69 locations.  

    The modern-day SAT was developed in 1925, based on an army intelligence test, and reworked to grade students on a point-based scale. Test-taking numbers have improved considerably since then; nowadays, over 1.5 million students take the SAT each year. We'd grade that "Excellent."

    with

    The prototype for the SAT looks nothing like today's version.  

    We hope you studied your Latin adjective declensions! The College Board administered its first exam this week in 1901, marking the beginning of the end for the absurdly inefficient admissions process of old.  

    Prior to 1900, students had to travel to prospective universities to be evaluated. Universities wrote and administered their own tests, which could more than a week for students to complete—making applications to just one or two schools financially burdensome for everyone involved.  

    In 1885, a school principal raised the issue with the National Education Association so a better process could be devised. After 15 years of planning, the College Board was formed. It hoped to standardize high school curricula, and streamline the college application process to make higher education available to a wider range of applicants.  

    The 1901 test consisted of essays in several topics: English, French, German, Latin, Greek, history, mathematics, chemistry, and physics. Forget about trying to score a perfect 2400, these students were vying for titles: Excellent, Good, Doubtful, Poor, or Very Poor. The test was administered to a mere 973 students in 69 locations.  

    The modern-day SAT was developed in 1925, based on an army intelligence test, and reworked to grade students on a point-based scale. Test-taking numbers have improved considerably since then; nowadays, over 1.5 million students take the SAT each year. We'd grade that "Excellent."

  • FREE
    STEM Daily Curio #667
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Squinting clearly
    A curio with
    View curio

    Squinting really does improve our vision. One reason is that squinting changes the shape of our eyes slightly, allowing light to focus more accurately on our retinas. But the real explanation is that our eyes operate just like a camera. Instead of film in the back of a camera, we have retinas in the back of our eyes. And, just like a camera, the smaller the aperture (opening allowing light through), the larger the depth of field (portion of the image in focus that is projected on the film/retina). This is because a narrower opening allows less light in, increasing the percentage of visible photons that will be sharply in focus. Since the lenses in our eyes malform as we age, our natural vision begins to have a shorter focal range, making the need for squinting greater. You can test this yourself. Make a tiny hole with your forefinger and thumb, and then look through the hole at an object across the room. The object you are looking will appear less blurry, especially if you are older. Check out an excellent video explaining all of this by clicking below. It will make things much clearer!

    with

    Squinting really does improve our vision. One reason is that squinting changes the shape of our eyes slightly, allowing light to focus more accurately on our retinas. But the real explanation is that our eyes operate just like a camera. Instead of film in the back of a camera, we have retinas in the back of our eyes. And, just like a camera, the smaller the aperture (opening allowing light through), the larger the depth of field (portion of the image in focus that is projected on the film/retina). This is because a narrower opening allows less light in, increasing the percentage of visible photons that will be sharply in focus. Since the lenses in our eyes malform as we age, our natural vision begins to have a shorter focal range, making the need for squinting greater. You can test this yourself. Make a tiny hole with your forefinger and thumb, and then look through the hole at an object across the room. The object you are looking will appear less blurry, especially if you are older. Check out an excellent video explaining all of this by clicking below. It will make things much clearer!

  • FREE
    Photography Photo Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Window dressings
    A curio with
    View curio

    Buildings are in the eye of the beholder. Time and Life photographer Ormond Gigli saw this abandoned Manhattan facade one day in the summer of 1960, and had a vision for an excellent photo. But there was a catch! He found out the building was set to be demolished the very next day. After a little haggling on Gigli's part and some calls to friends in high places, the photographer was allowed one lunch hour—the very next day!—to set up the ultimate high-fashion photoshoot. Wrangling the women and Rolls Royce in time for the shoot wasn't Gigli's only issue; some of the bricks on the windowsills were disintegrating as the models were arranging themselves in the windows. Luckily, Gigli got the shot, and everyone in Girls in the Windows, New York City was immortalized in pictures—a much better option than being immortalized in stone, in this case!
     

    Image credit & copyright: Heritage Auctions
     

    with

    Buildings are in the eye of the beholder. Time and Life photographer Ormond Gigli saw this abandoned Manhattan facade one day in the summer of 1960, and had a vision for an excellent photo. But there was a catch! He found out the building was set to be demolished the very next day. After a little haggling on Gigli's part and some calls to friends in high places, the photographer was allowed one lunch hour—the very next day!—to set up the ultimate high-fashion photoshoot. Wrangling the women and Rolls Royce in time for the shoot wasn't Gigli's only issue; some of the bricks on the windowsills were disintegrating as the models were arranging themselves in the windows. Luckily, Gigli got the shot, and everyone in Girls in the Windows, New York City was immortalized in pictures—a much better option than being immortalized in stone, in this case!
     

    Image credit & copyright: Heritage Auctions
     

Get started!
Save
Complete your purchase

Please show this teacher your appreciation:

Leave comment
Love this lesson
Tip $1
Tip $2
Tip $5
500 characters left
Thank You
Thank you for your generosity!
No thanks
Continue
Whoops!
Your free trial of Curious+ has expired