185 matching results

  • 5
    31 min
    5-part Crafts course
    Playing
    17 CQ
    DIY Makeup Storage
    A 5-part course with StyleNovice
    View course

    In this short course, you’ll use basic sewing and crafting skills to create a variety of stylish DIY makeup storage solutions, including makeup bags, a makeup brush roll, and a hanging door organizer!

    In this short course, you’ll use basic sewing and crafting skills to create a variety of stylish DIY makeup storage solutions, including makeup bags, a makeup brush roll, and a hanging door organizer!

  • 10
    125 min
    10-part Beauty course
    Playing
    67 CQ
    Basic Makeup Application
    A 10-part course with Rocio Laura
    View course

    Makeup is a versatile art. It can be an everyday thing, or an occasional indulgence. Beauty guru Rocio Laura shares her advice on basic makeup application, from stunning eyes to luscious lips.

    Makeup is a versatile art. It can be an everyday thing, or an occasional indulgence. Beauty guru Rocio Laura shares her advice on basic makeup application, from stunning eyes to luscious lips.

  • 8
    62 min
    8-part Beauty course
    Playing
    36 CQ
    Eye Makeup Style Secrets
    An 8-part course with Pink Pistachio
    View course

    Looking for easy eye makeup tips? In this course, style blogger Pink Pistachio shares her personal style secrets for beautiful eye makeup. Learn how to apply basic eye makeup and classic glam looks.

    Looking for easy eye makeup tips? In this course, style blogger Pink Pistachio shares her personal style secrets for beautiful eye makeup. Learn how to apply basic eye makeup and classic glam looks.

  • 10
    101 min
    10-part Beauty course
    Playing
    56 CQ
    Skincare and Makeup for Beginners
    A 10-part course with Itty Bitty Annie
    View course

    Join beauty expert Annie Marie in her prettiness primer--to learn skincare essentials and makeup techniques that are sure to impress. If you're new to makeup, or have been stuck in a beauty rut since JT was with N’Sync, it’s time for a refresh! Discover all there is to know about makeup brushes, pigment colors, and the most affordable (but still fabulous) makeup brands. Above all, learn to have fun with your beauty routine--you'll be gorgeous!

    Join beauty expert Annie Marie in her prettiness primer--to learn skincare essentials and makeup techniques that are sure to impress. If you're new to makeup, or have been stuck in a beauty rut since JT was with N’Sync, it’s time for a refresh! Discover all there is to know about makeup brushes, pigment colors, and the most affordable (but still fabulous) makeup brands. Above all, learn to have fun with your beauty routine--you'll be gorgeous!

  • 8
    31 min
    8-part Beauty course
    Playing
    19 CQ
    Stylish Hair & Makeup Ideas
    An 8-part course with Eva Chung
    View course

    Get styled from head to toe with this course on hair and makeup ideas. Start with a few makeup tips before moving onto hairstyles for long hair. Then, polish your look with a fun manicure!

    Get styled from head to toe with this course on hair and makeup ideas. Start with a few makeup tips before moving onto hairstyles for long hair. Then, polish your look with a fun manicure!

  • 10
    31 min
    10-part Personal Growth course
    Playing
    19 CQ
    Life Advice for Teens & Tweens
    A 10-part course with Not Your Mum
    View course

    After age 11, everything starts to change. But don't worry! This course with Not Your Mum provides honest and heartfelt advice on dealing with everything from mood swings, to body odor and shyness.

    After age 11, everything starts to change. But don't worry! This course with Not Your Mum provides honest and heartfelt advice on dealing with everything from mood swings, to body odor and shyness.

  • 6
    41 min
    6-part Video Editing course
    Playing
    23 CQ
    How to Make a Low Budget Music Video
    A 6-part course with Budget Music Videos
    View course

    Make a low budget music video from start to finish! Learn what equipment you need (and don’t need), and get tips for choosing locations, doing hair and makeup, and filming and editing the music video.

    Make a low budget music video from start to finish! Learn what equipment you need (and don’t need), and get tips for choosing locations, doing hair and makeup, and filming and editing the music video.

  • 10
    126 min
    10-part Adobe Suite course
    Playing
    70 CQ
    Picture-Perfect Retouching in Photoshop
    A 10-part course with Photo and Grime
    View course

    Make your photos cover-worthy! Master professional Photoshop retouching techniques for fashion photography. Learn how to smooth skin, apply digital makeup, and create startling color effects!

    Make your photos cover-worthy! Master professional Photoshop retouching techniques for fashion photography. Learn how to smooth skin, apply digital makeup, and create startling color effects!

  • 10
    32 min
    10-part Public Relations course
    Playing
    23 CQ
    How to Look Good on Video and TV
    A 10-part course with TJ Walker
    View course

    Want to look confident, comfortable, and relaxed on video or giving a TV interview? Learn how to sit, stand and gesture naturally, how to avoid makeup and wardrobe mistakes, and more!

    Want to look confident, comfortable, and relaxed on video or giving a TV interview? Learn how to sit, stand and gesture naturally, how to avoid makeup and wardrobe mistakes, and more!

Lessons Sort By Relevance

  • 1 min
    FREE
    Beauty lesson
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Natural vs. synthetic makeup brushes
    A lesson with Rocio Laura
    View lesson
  • 1 min
    FREE
    Beauty lesson
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    How to apply fake eyelashes
    A lesson with Eva Chung
    View lesson
  • 5 min
    Beauty lesson
    Playing
    3 CQ
    DIY Dark & Neutral Smoky Eye Makeup
    A lesson with Eva Chung
    View lesson

    Going for a glamorous look tonight? This DIY beauty lesson from Eva Chung shows you how to create both dark and neutral smoky eyes in minutes.

    Going for a glamorous look tonight? This DIY beauty lesson from Eva Chung shows you how to create both dark and neutral smoky eyes in minutes.

  • 9 min
    Beauty lesson
    Playing
    5 CQ
    Glamorous Golden Eye Makeup
    A lesson with Pink Pistachio
    View lesson

    Party, anniversary, or girls’ night coming up? Add a little glamour to your style - learn to apply primer, eyeshadow, and eyeliner for gloriously golden eyes!

    Party, anniversary, or girls’ night coming up? Add a little glamour to your style - learn to apply primer, eyeshadow, and eyeliner for gloriously golden eyes!

  • 7 min
    Beauty lesson
    Playing
    4 CQ
    Contouring & Highlighting Makeup
    A lesson with Itty Bitty Annie
    View lesson

    Become a glowing goddess! Learn how to do your makeup to contour your face using bronzer, blush, and highlighter. Annie Marie talks technique and products!

    Become a glowing goddess! Learn how to do your makeup to contour your face using bronzer, blush, and highlighter. Annie Marie talks technique and products!

  • 3 min
    Beauty lesson
    Playing
    2 CQ
    How to Apply Everyday Makeup
    A lesson with Makeup Tutorials by Hayley Segar
    View lesson

    Need some tips for how to apply makeup? In this lesson, Hayley reveals her everyday makeup tricks, from eyeshadow to lips. Learn to look fabulous every day!

    Need some tips for how to apply makeup? In this lesson, Hayley reveals her everyday makeup tricks, from eyeshadow to lips. Learn to look fabulous every day!

  • 5 min
    Beauty lesson
    Playing
    3 CQ
    Kim Kardashian Makeup Foundation
    A lesson with Daniel Chinchilla
    View lesson

    Ever wonder how Kim Kardashian has such great makeup? The answer is the right beauty products, and lots of contouring! Learn how to get her look in this lesson!

    Ever wonder how Kim Kardashian has such great makeup? The answer is the right beauty products, and lots of contouring! Learn how to get her look in this lesson!

  • 11 min
    Beauty lesson
    Playing
    6 CQ
    How to Look Well Rested Makeup Routine
    A lesson with Pink Pistachio
    View lesson

    In this DIY makeup lesson, lifestyle and beauty blogger Pink Pistachio will show you how to look fresh and well rested even if you’ve been up all night.

    In this DIY makeup lesson, lifestyle and beauty blogger Pink Pistachio will show you how to look fresh and well rested even if you’ve been up all night.

  • 6 min
    Beauty lesson
    Playing
    4 CQ
    Five-Minute Makeup Routine
    A lesson with Pink Pistachio
    View lesson

    Beat the rush with this five-minute makeup routine. Learn how to use double-duty and time-saving cosmetics to quickly achieve a flawless look!

    Beat the rush with this five-minute makeup routine. Learn how to use double-duty and time-saving cosmetics to quickly achieve a flawless look!

Curios

  • FREE
    Beauty Daily Curio #2078
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    The real master of disguise
    A curio with
    View curio

    Here's a familiar trope: a sneaky CIA agent duping guards, locals, and even other agents by wearing a hyper-realistic prosthetic mask. I always thought the trope was just that—a trope. But the other day, I bumped into a new explanatory interview with Jonna Mendez, former CIA Chief of Disguise. Among the many James Bond-esque subterfuges she helped design, one of them was the invaluable five-second mask (shown above). These latex masks came in all ethnicities, genders, and bone structures. They could be thrown on in under five seconds—without any need to look in a mirror to see if it was askew. Better yet, they could be taken off even faster and tucked into one's armpit, for none to see. In regards to believability, you could frown, speak, and squint realistically. As you might guess, this prosthetic technology originated in Hollywood. But unlike those masks of cinema, which can take hours and hours to apply, Mendez's masks were all about speed. Which was made possible by tailoring each mask to its respective agent. Each agent underwent a facial impression, much like a dental impression, for the perfect fit. It took Mendez and her people 10 years to finalize these uncanny masks, circa the 1970s and 1980s. When Hollywood makeup artists first encountered them, they were in wonderment. Today, the CIA doesn't use the five-second mask anymore… well, at least that's what we're told. Mendez says she too is itching to know what direction the CIA's disguises have gone in since her retirement in 1993. If you're at all paranoid by the CIA's chameleon abilities, just make a habit of playing the "Got Your Nose" kids game with everyone you meet!
     

    Below: Former CIA Chief of Disguise Jonna Mendez reflects on her spy masks.
     

     

    Image credit & copyright: International Spy Museum/Clint Emerson
     

    with

    Here's a familiar trope: a sneaky CIA agent duping guards, locals, and even other agents by wearing a hyper-realistic prosthetic mask. I always thought the trope was just that—a trope. But the other day, I bumped into a new explanatory interview with Jonna Mendez, former CIA Chief of Disguise. Among the many James Bond-esque subterfuges she helped design, one of them was the invaluable five-second mask (shown above). These latex masks came in all ethnicities, genders, and bone structures. They could be thrown on in under five seconds—without any need to look in a mirror to see if it was askew. Better yet, they could be taken off even faster and tucked into one's armpit, for none to see. In regards to believability, you could frown, speak, and squint realistically. As you might guess, this prosthetic technology originated in Hollywood. But unlike those masks of cinema, which can take hours and hours to apply, Mendez's masks were all about speed. Which was made possible by tailoring each mask to its respective agent. Each agent underwent a facial impression, much like a dental impression, for the perfect fit. It took Mendez and her people 10 years to finalize these uncanny masks, circa the 1970s and 1980s. When Hollywood makeup artists first encountered them, they were in wonderment. Today, the CIA doesn't use the five-second mask anymore… well, at least that's what we're told. Mendez says she too is itching to know what direction the CIA's disguises have gone in since her retirement in 1993. If you're at all paranoid by the CIA's chameleon abilities, just make a habit of playing the "Got Your Nose" kids game with everyone you meet!
     

    Below: Former CIA Chief of Disguise Jonna Mendez reflects on her spy masks.
     

     

    Image credit & copyright: International Spy Museum/Clint Emerson
     

  • FREE
    Art Appreciation Art Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    New Year, same Yi
    A curio with
    View curio

    Title: Untitled
    Artist: "Red" Hong Yi
    Created: 2014
    Medium: lipstick
     

    These firecrackers endow luscious, lunar lips. To celebrate the 2014 Lunar New Year, artist "Red" Hong Yi produced cultural Chinese scenes from everyday cosmetics products. Pictured above are exploding "fireworks" she crafted from red-hot lipstick by drawing the two lanterns, the fuse, and the sparks before dicing the stick into pyrotechnic tubes. This festive makeup series is just one of Red's many unique collections. The artist has employed every material from chopsticks to seeds to coffee stains in her works, which range in size from handheld pieces, like the one above, to portraits over ten feet tall. Red even designed one of the Google Doodles on the search engine's home page; naturally, she crafted hers from flower petals. Who knows—maybe Google will use one of her makeup designs to commemorate the Lunar New Year tomorrow?
     

    Below: cranes crafted from cotton wool, eyeliner, and lipstick; a village painted with nail polish; sprouting leaves formed out of eyeliner pencil shavings; Red's implemented Google Doodle logo.
     

     

     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Red Hong Yi
     

    with

    Title: Untitled
    Artist: "Red" Hong Yi
    Created: 2014
    Medium: lipstick
     

    These firecrackers endow luscious, lunar lips. To celebrate the 2014 Lunar New Year, artist "Red" Hong Yi produced cultural Chinese scenes from everyday cosmetics products. Pictured above are exploding "fireworks" she crafted from red-hot lipstick by drawing the two lanterns, the fuse, and the sparks before dicing the stick into pyrotechnic tubes. This festive makeup series is just one of Red's many unique collections. The artist has employed every material from chopsticks to seeds to coffee stains in her works, which range in size from handheld pieces, like the one above, to portraits over ten feet tall. Red even designed one of the Google Doodles on the search engine's home page; naturally, she crafted hers from flower petals. Who knows—maybe Google will use one of her makeup designs to commemorate the Lunar New Year tomorrow?
     

    Below: cranes crafted from cotton wool, eyeliner, and lipstick; a village painted with nail polish; sprouting leaves formed out of eyeliner pencil shavings; Red's implemented Google Doodle logo.
     

     

     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Red Hong Yi
     

  • FREE
    Beauty Daily Curio #2195
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    The politics of a red lip
    A curio with
    View curio

    Today is International Women's Day.
     

    At the 2019 State of the Union, members of Congress wore white clothing and red lipstick to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th amendment.
    Passed by Congress on June 4, 1919, and ratified on August 18, 1920, the amendment states, "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex." Although suffragettes began campaigning for women's right to vote before the Civil War, the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 is often-cited as the solidifying moment for the movement. During the convention Elizabeth Cady Stanton produced the Declaration of Sentiments, also known as the Women's Rights Declaration, arguing that, "all men and women are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness." By the turn of the 20th century, American suffragettes were easily identified by their white garments, symbols of virtue and purity.
     
    In 1912, makeup maven Elizabeth Arden joined the suffragettes. Marching down Fifth Avenue in New York City, she handed out free tubes of red lipstick. The bold color quickly grew in popularity with leadership—not only did it shock men, but it also served as a sign of liberation and rebellion. Suffragettes in Europe and the British commonwealth also adopted the red lip as a sign of global solidarity. Of course, lipstick has been around since antiquity, serving as a marker for status (be it royalty or sex worker) as well as race. Although the suffragette movement in the United States is primarily associated with white, middle- and upper-class women, women of color actively contributed to the movement. Such narratives are rarely highlighted in feminist history. This exclusion is particularly important to understanding the suffragettes movement. After all, the 19th amendment really only gave affluent white women the right to vote. Moreover, women of color continued to be chastised for wearing a bold lip, while white women were (and are) praised for the same choice. So when the congress women pictured above wore bold lips in 2019, they made a statement about the importance of inclusivity in women's rights—be it equal pay or equal representation. And yes, even the right to wear red lipstick without criticism.

     
    [Image description: Members of Congress at the 2019, including Nita Lowey, Nydia Velazquez, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Judy Chu, and Eleanor Holmes Norton in the front row, wearing white and red lipstick.] Credit & copyright: Tom Williams, CQ Roll Call, Getty Images.

    with

    Today is International Women's Day.
     

    At the 2019 State of the Union, members of Congress wore white clothing and red lipstick to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the passing of the 19th amendment.
    Passed by Congress on June 4, 1919, and ratified on August 18, 1920, the amendment states, "The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex." Although suffragettes began campaigning for women's right to vote before the Civil War, the Seneca Falls Convention in 1848 is often-cited as the solidifying moment for the movement. During the convention Elizabeth Cady Stanton produced the Declaration of Sentiments, also known as the Women's Rights Declaration, arguing that, "all men and women are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain inalienable rights, that among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness." By the turn of the 20th century, American suffragettes were easily identified by their white garments, symbols of virtue and purity.
     
    In 1912, makeup maven Elizabeth Arden joined the suffragettes. Marching down Fifth Avenue in New York City, she handed out free tubes of red lipstick. The bold color quickly grew in popularity with leadership—not only did it shock men, but it also served as a sign of liberation and rebellion. Suffragettes in Europe and the British commonwealth also adopted the red lip as a sign of global solidarity. Of course, lipstick has been around since antiquity, serving as a marker for status (be it royalty or sex worker) as well as race. Although the suffragette movement in the United States is primarily associated with white, middle- and upper-class women, women of color actively contributed to the movement. Such narratives are rarely highlighted in feminist history. This exclusion is particularly important to understanding the suffragettes movement. After all, the 19th amendment really only gave affluent white women the right to vote. Moreover, women of color continued to be chastised for wearing a bold lip, while white women were (and are) praised for the same choice. So when the congress women pictured above wore bold lips in 2019, they made a statement about the importance of inclusivity in women's rights—be it equal pay or equal representation. And yes, even the right to wear red lipstick without criticism.

     
    [Image description: Members of Congress at the 2019, including Nita Lowey, Nydia Velazquez, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Judy Chu, and Eleanor Holmes Norton in the front row, wearing white and red lipstick.] Credit & copyright: Tom Williams, CQ Roll Call, Getty Images.

  • FREE
    Photography Photo Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Holding court
    A curio with
    View curio

    Regal is as regal does when it comes to Pat McGrath and her makeup work. McGrath recently became the first makeup artist to receive the title of Dame as a Member of the Order of the British Empire. While looking at McGrath's 2016 W magazine cover and editorial work with pop star Rihanna, it's easy to see why McGrath's inventiveness has made her one of the most in-demand makeup artists of the past 30 years. To give Rihanna the bejeweled look, McGrath initially applied a foundation from her own line called McGrath Labs Skin Fetish 003. From there, three-dimensional Cartier jewelry pieces were placed together to create the golden eyepiece. Gold flakes and liquid-appearing makeup effects were added beneath the eye, as well as the red lip color and paillettes. The overall effect is a futuristic baroque look, and definitely one of McGrath's most memorable works. We might even call it one of her crown jewels!

     
    Image credit & copyright: Steven Klein / W Magazine
     

    Written by: Esther P.

    with

    Regal is as regal does when it comes to Pat McGrath and her makeup work. McGrath recently became the first makeup artist to receive the title of Dame as a Member of the Order of the British Empire. While looking at McGrath's 2016 W magazine cover and editorial work with pop star Rihanna, it's easy to see why McGrath's inventiveness has made her one of the most in-demand makeup artists of the past 30 years. To give Rihanna the bejeweled look, McGrath initially applied a foundation from her own line called McGrath Labs Skin Fetish 003. From there, three-dimensional Cartier jewelry pieces were placed together to create the golden eyepiece. Gold flakes and liquid-appearing makeup effects were added beneath the eye, as well as the red lip color and paillettes. The overall effect is a futuristic baroque look, and definitely one of McGrath's most memorable works. We might even call it one of her crown jewels!

     
    Image credit & copyright: Steven Klein / W Magazine
     

    Written by: Esther P.

  • FREE
    Composition Photo Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Best face forward
    A curio with
    View curio

    In some cultures, brides wear white gowns to their weddings; in the Gorani tribe of southern Kosovo, it's a bride's face that gets the ivory treatment. As part of pagan and Muslim traditions in the region, a betrothed woman has her visage painted with a base layer of white cream face paint, and then set with powder. From there, a straight wire is dipped in gold and pressed into the makeup, providing the angular lines which represent the "golden roads" of life. They lead to the three circles, which represent three different stages in life; meanwhile, the red and blue dots serve as symbols of fertility. Once her face painting is completed, the bride is dressed in elaborate ceremonial clothing, and joins her family to meet her husband-to-be, on what is the first of three days of wedding celebrations for the happy couple. If a wedding is planned as meticulously as the bride's makeup, guests are sure to experience an unforgettable matrimonial party!

     

    Below: the video Nusja Jone - Bride (Kosovo), which shows the makeup application process for a Gorani bride.
     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Yll Citaku
     

    with

    In some cultures, brides wear white gowns to their weddings; in the Gorani tribe of southern Kosovo, it's a bride's face that gets the ivory treatment. As part of pagan and Muslim traditions in the region, a betrothed woman has her visage painted with a base layer of white cream face paint, and then set with powder. From there, a straight wire is dipped in gold and pressed into the makeup, providing the angular lines which represent the "golden roads" of life. They lead to the three circles, which represent three different stages in life; meanwhile, the red and blue dots serve as symbols of fertility. Once her face painting is completed, the bride is dressed in elaborate ceremonial clothing, and joins her family to meet her husband-to-be, on what is the first of three days of wedding celebrations for the happy couple. If a wedding is planned as meticulously as the bride's makeup, guests are sure to experience an unforgettable matrimonial party!

     

    Below: the video Nusja Jone - Bride (Kosovo), which shows the makeup application process for a Gorani bride.
     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Yll Citaku
     

  • FREE
    Biology Daily Curio #98
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    A curio with
    View curio

    While neuroscientists have discovered no statistical difference between men and women's capacity for intelligence, they have found significant differences in the makeup of their brains. New research shows that men's brains typically have about 6.5 times more grey matter - the area of the brain that processes information - than women do. Women tend to have about 9.5 times more white matter, which is responsible for connecting the brain's information processing centers. More grey matter might make men more likely to perform better at tasks that require local processing, such as mathematics; more white matter could explain why women outperform men at tasks requiring multiple brain process connections, such as language and multi-tasking... and all board games!

    with

    While neuroscientists have discovered no statistical difference between men and women's capacity for intelligence, they have found significant differences in the makeup of their brains. New research shows that men's brains typically have about 6.5 times more grey matter - the area of the brain that processes information - than women do. Women tend to have about 9.5 times more white matter, which is responsible for connecting the brain's information processing centers. More grey matter might make men more likely to perform better at tasks that require local processing, such as mathematics; more white matter could explain why women outperform men at tasks requiring multiple brain process connections, such as language and multi-tasking... and all board games!

  • FREE
    Photography Photo Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Miss monster
    A curio with
    View curio

    The annals of horror would be lacking without the Universal Classic Monsters—and one, in particular, owes his creation to Milicent Patrick. The first woman in film to work in special effects and makeup, Patrick is now (rightfully) credited with designing the gilled visage of the Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954). She was a gifted artist who was also one of the first women hired as an animator at Disney, with her work being featured in the original Fantasia (1940). When Creature came out, Patrick was sent on a promotional tour entitled "The Beauty Who Created the Beast." The loss of her legacy likely had something to do with the head of Universal's makeup department, George "Bud" Westmore. Ever the egomaniac, Westmore sent memos to the heads of the studio insisting the Creature was entirely his creation (he was lying). Patrick was subsequently fired and never worked in Hollywood again. A recently published biography about Patrick entitled The Lady from the Black Lagoon, written by Mallory O'Meara, has done away with the lies and recovered her much-deserved reputation—that of a cinematic Golden Age legend and an innovator in horror films!

     

    Below: a snapshot of Patrick working on the entire Creature suit, and another photo of Dr. Patrick and Mr. Hyde mask-goofing around.
     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Milicent Patrick Family Collection
     

    with

    The annals of horror would be lacking without the Universal Classic Monsters—and one, in particular, owes his creation to Milicent Patrick. The first woman in film to work in special effects and makeup, Patrick is now (rightfully) credited with designing the gilled visage of the Creature from the Black Lagoon (1954). She was a gifted artist who was also one of the first women hired as an animator at Disney, with her work being featured in the original Fantasia (1940). When Creature came out, Patrick was sent on a promotional tour entitled "The Beauty Who Created the Beast." The loss of her legacy likely had something to do with the head of Universal's makeup department, George "Bud" Westmore. Ever the egomaniac, Westmore sent memos to the heads of the studio insisting the Creature was entirely his creation (he was lying). Patrick was subsequently fired and never worked in Hollywood again. A recently published biography about Patrick entitled The Lady from the Black Lagoon, written by Mallory O'Meara, has done away with the lies and recovered her much-deserved reputation—that of a cinematic Golden Age legend and an innovator in horror films!

     

    Below: a snapshot of Patrick working on the entire Creature suit, and another photo of Dr. Patrick and Mr. Hyde mask-goofing around.
     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Milicent Patrick Family Collection
     

  • FREE
    Composition Photo Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Uruk-cry baby
    A curio with
    View curio

    That's the last babysitter we hire off of Craigslist Isengard! Shown above in full Uruk-hai costume is Māori actor Lawrence Makoare having a little fun on the set of director Peter Jackson's The Fellowship of the Ring. For the flick, Makoare sat still each day for four-and-a-half hours as makeup artists glued prosthetics to his face and painted his skin a reddish-charcoal color, only to sit another hour-and-a-half after filming so it could be delicately removed. And that was on a good day; for the nightmarish mud-cocoon birthing scene of Makoare's character—a hulking orc named Lurtz—the actor spent over 11 hours twiddling his thumbs in the makeup chair! On set, his woes only continued. Actors who played orcs routinely fainted from heat exhaustion during action sequences, and Makoare's mustard-yellow contacts chafed his eyes. "They were like a ping-pong ball cut in half, and if you blink too much in them they dig into your eyes. It bloody hurt," he said. We can't help but pity Makoare—even when he poses as a snarling servant of evil!
     

    Below: more photos from the set of Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings trilogy.
     

     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: BBC News / Peter Jackson / New Line Cinema
     

    with

    That's the last babysitter we hire off of Craigslist Isengard! Shown above in full Uruk-hai costume is Māori actor Lawrence Makoare having a little fun on the set of director Peter Jackson's The Fellowship of the Ring. For the flick, Makoare sat still each day for four-and-a-half hours as makeup artists glued prosthetics to his face and painted his skin a reddish-charcoal color, only to sit another hour-and-a-half after filming so it could be delicately removed. And that was on a good day; for the nightmarish mud-cocoon birthing scene of Makoare's character—a hulking orc named Lurtz—the actor spent over 11 hours twiddling his thumbs in the makeup chair! On set, his woes only continued. Actors who played orcs routinely fainted from heat exhaustion during action sequences, and Makoare's mustard-yellow contacts chafed his eyes. "They were like a ping-pong ball cut in half, and if you blink too much in them they dig into your eyes. It bloody hurt," he said. We can't help but pity Makoare—even when he poses as a snarling servant of evil!
     

    Below: more photos from the set of Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings trilogy.
     

     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: BBC News / Peter Jackson / New Line Cinema
     

  • FREE
    Travel PP&T Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Place: Lake Hillier
    A curio with
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    A natural wonder Willy Wonka would have killed for.  

    That Pepto-Bismol-colored oval up there? That's a lake. Lake Hillier, to be exact, located in the Recherche Archipelago off the southern coast of Australia. It was discovered 215 years ago this month by Matthew Flinders, a British explorer. Flinders named the lake after William Hillier, a crewman who died of dysentery during the voyage. Ironically, a bit of Pepto-Bismol might have saved Hillier, if only it had been invented. Some have taken to calling it "Pink Lake"; we're guessing they're trying to put the incident in the past.  

    The pink color can be attributed to the lake's chemical makeup. A type of green algae known as Dunaliella salina contributes high levels of beta-Carotene, the substance that makes carrots, pumpkins, and mangoes orange. The red comes from halophilic bacteria, attracted to the lake's high salinity.  

    Believe it or not, Lake Hillier isn't the only pink lake in the world. Lake Retba in Senegal also has a pinkish hue and is five times as big. There, locals have even developed an industry around the lake; around 1,000 workers extract salt from the lake bed daily to sell internationally.  

    Despite how it looks, it's safe to swim in Lake Hillier due to the water's high salinity. If you can get to it, that is. There is no easy way for tourists to visit the Recherche Archipelago, as the nearest airport is over 80 miles away. But the determined will be rewarded with a surreal view.

    with

    A natural wonder Willy Wonka would have killed for.  

    That Pepto-Bismol-colored oval up there? That's a lake. Lake Hillier, to be exact, located in the Recherche Archipelago off the southern coast of Australia. It was discovered 215 years ago this month by Matthew Flinders, a British explorer. Flinders named the lake after William Hillier, a crewman who died of dysentery during the voyage. Ironically, a bit of Pepto-Bismol might have saved Hillier, if only it had been invented. Some have taken to calling it "Pink Lake"; we're guessing they're trying to put the incident in the past.  

    The pink color can be attributed to the lake's chemical makeup. A type of green algae known as Dunaliella salina contributes high levels of beta-Carotene, the substance that makes carrots, pumpkins, and mangoes orange. The red comes from halophilic bacteria, attracted to the lake's high salinity.  

    Believe it or not, Lake Hillier isn't the only pink lake in the world. Lake Retba in Senegal also has a pinkish hue and is five times as big. There, locals have even developed an industry around the lake; around 1,000 workers extract salt from the lake bed daily to sell internationally.  

    Despite how it looks, it's safe to swim in Lake Hillier due to the water's high salinity. If you can get to it, that is. There is no easy way for tourists to visit the Recherche Archipelago, as the nearest airport is over 80 miles away. But the determined will be rewarded with a surreal view.

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