Keith Hughes
Facilitator of Learning Experiences

Keith Hughes teaches AP US Government and US History at McKinley High School in Buffalo, NY and is the face behind HipHughes History, part of PoliPop and the Maker Studios Network. He is also an adjunct professor of digital literacy at the Graduate School of Education at SUNY Buffalo. Hughes is best known for his expertise in producing educational videos, but his talents also extend to creating political concept cartoons, online quizzes, graphic organizers, music videos, and numerous other educational aids.

Teacher Statistics
Lessons:
Total Views:
Enrolled Students:
Curious Cards:
10
1,762
273
17
18
54
All Lessons by Keith Hughes
1

Did you know that before the U.S. Constitution there were the Articles of Confederation? Do you know why the Articles only lasted 11 years? In this history lesson, Hip Hughes guides you through the Articles of Confederation, including their origin and structure, and the balance of power that eventually led to the end of the Articles and the creation of the U.S. Constitution.

12:48
108
30
0
3
1

In this lesson, Hip Hughes explains the history of the Constitutional Convention, and the three major compromises that allowed for the creation of the U.S. Constitution. Learn what the Virginia Plan and New Jersey Plan have to do with the Bi-Cameral Legislature we have today, and how the struggle between the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists led to the creation of the Bill of Rights.

14:32
141
42
2
5
1

Learn about the letter that began the American Revolutionary War. Written from the Continental Congress to the King, the Declaration of Independence outlined the colonists’ grievances and intent to form a new government. Follow along with Mr. Hughes, of HipHughes History, as he explains the document cited as one of the most celebrated manifestos for human freedom and self-government in the history of the Western world.

3:16
874
82
8
19
1

Are you hungry for political science knowledge? In this lesson, Hip Hughes explains Federalism in the United States, beginning with Dual Federalism, and the Layer Cake model of Federalism (beginning at the end of the Civil War), before ending with Marble Cake Federalism (which, in contrast to Layer Cake Federalism, has less distinct separations between the role of the Fed and the powers of the States). But all this cake will only leave you hungry for more…more lessons on Federalism, that is.

15:15
100
38
0
1
1

In this second part of his lesson on Federalism in the United States, Hip Hughes outlines four forms of Federalism, beginning with LBJ’s Creative Federalism, in which the government expanded its power in the creation of social welfare programs, and ending with Fiscal Federalism (an example of which are the competitive grants used by the Obama administration to promote progress in education). So now that you know all the forms of Federalism, how much power do you think is too much Federal power?

11:02
47
12
0
1
1

Confused about why there are electoral votes in US presidential elections? Learn about the Electoral College and the part it plays in choosing the president. In this lesson, HipHughes will explain how electoral votes work, how they are allocated, and why the media pays such close attention to the election map.

10:49
129
37
0
2
1

Everyone knows that Barack Obama beat Mitt Romney in the 2012 presidential election because he had more electoral college votes. But what is the difference between electoral and popular votes? In this US History lesson, Hip Hughes explains the electoral college - and sheds light on the three main reasons why Obama won: the power of the incumbency, the primaries, and demographics.

5:40
35
10
1
2
1

Sometimes the US Government may seem slow to act, but the speed at which the government works is actually a product of its structure, designed to protect your constitutional rights and freedoms. To prevent the abuse of power, the three branches of government are structured so that there are checks and balances - and no single branch has all the power. Learn how Judicial review and the president’s power to pardon, among other checks, protect you.

17:57
73
13
0
2
1

In this lecture on the Executive Branch of the United States government, Hip Hughes outlines the main components of Article II of the Constitution: the powers of the President (the power to veto, sign treaties, issue pardons, and more), and the relationship between the President and the Senate (which allows for checks and balances on executive powers).

14:46
171
68
7
14
1

How does a law with majority support not end up getting passed? In this lesson, Hip Hughes explains what the filibuster is: where it came from, and how it is used by a Senate minority group to prevent a law from being passed. The filibuster has changed a lot since the days when Mr. Smith went to Washington; with this information, you can decide whether or not that is for the best.

6:33
84
30
0
5
Failed to load more lessons. Please try again.