46 matching results

  • 8
    40 min
    8-part Art Appreciation course
    Playing
    22 CQ
    Art History from Raphael to Picasso
    An 8-part course with James Earle
    View course

    The old masters created some of the most beloved works of art in the world! Discover them in this art history survey course, and journey from the High Renaissance and through the twentieth century.

    The old masters created some of the most beloved works of art in the world! Discover them in this art history survey course, and journey from the High Renaissance and through the twentieth century.

  • 12
    115 min
    12-part Art Appreciation course
    Playing
    62 CQ
    Art History and Appreciation
    A 12-part course with Multiple Teachers
    View course

    Explore art through the ages! From ancient Rome to Andy Warhol, you’ll review the theory and context that have shaped some of the most influential works of art in history.

    Explore art through the ages! From ancient Rome to Andy Warhol, you’ll review the theory and context that have shaped some of the most influential works of art in history.

  • 8
    177 min
    8-part Mixed Media Art course
    Playing
    93 CQ
    Mixed Media Collage Projects
    An 8-part course with Doris Charest Studio
    View course

    Join Doris Charest Studio to choose the right art supplies, learn the basics of collage, and create mixed media art projects featuring fruit, a guitarist, an abstract flower, and more!

    Join Doris Charest Studio to choose the right art supplies, learn the basics of collage, and create mixed media art projects featuring fruit, a guitarist, an abstract flower, and more!

Lessons Sort By Relevance

  • 3 min
    Art Appreciation lesson
    Playing
    2 CQ
    Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon
    A lesson with James Earle
    View lesson

    Picasso’s works are very valuable, but often difficult to interpret. Learning about Picasso’s culture can help you understand these intense works of art.

    Picasso’s works are very valuable, but often difficult to interpret. Learning about Picasso’s culture can help you understand these intense works of art.

  • 16 min
    Entrepreneurship lesson
    Playing
    9 CQ
    The Ultimate Entrepreneur Takes Action
    A lesson with Vladimir Raykov
    View lesson

    Learn the mindset that successful entrepreneurs possess when it comes to taking action. As Pablo Picasso said, action is the foundational key to all success.

    Learn the mindset that successful entrepreneurs possess when it comes to taking action. As Pablo Picasso said, action is the foundational key to all success.

  • 33 min
    Mixed Media Art lesson
    Playing
    17 CQ
    Guitarist Mixed Media Collage | Part 1
    A lesson with Doris Charest Studio
    View lesson

    We create a guitarist in the style of Picasso. Follow along with me in this fun and easy step-by-step project using collage and watercolour.

    We create a guitarist in the style of Picasso. Follow along with me in this fun and easy step-by-step project using collage and watercolour.

  • 18 min
    Mixed Media Art lesson
    Playing
    10 CQ
    Guitarist Mixed Media Collage | Part 2
    A lesson with Doris Charest Studio
    View lesson

    After creating a collaged background for your project, learn how to use watercolors to paint your guitarist in Picasso style in this mixed media art lesson.

    After creating a collaged background for your project, learn how to use watercolors to paint your guitarist in Picasso style in this mixed media art lesson.

  • 7 min
    Acrylic Painting lesson
    Playing
    4 CQ
    Introduction to Mixed Media Collage
    A lesson with Doris Charest Studio
    View lesson

    Want to learn a fun and easy art form? Dive into mixed media collage by learning what it is along with the art supplies you'll need for your first project.

    Want to learn a fun and easy art form? Dive into mixed media collage by learning what it is along with the art supplies you'll need for your first project.

  • 2 min
    FREE
    Humanities Word Curio
    Playing
    Free
    2 CQ
    Word of the Day: Protean
    A lesson with Merriam-Webster
    View lesson

    Word of the Day : February 18, 2017

    protean \PROH-tee-un\ adjective

    Definition

    1 : of or resembling Proteus in having a varied nature or ability to assume...

    Word of the Day : February 18, 2017

    protean \PROH-tee-un\ adjective

    Definition

    1 : of or resembling Proteus in having a varied nature or ability to assume...

  • 5 min
    FREE
    Crafts lesson
    Playing
    Free
    3 CQ
    Intro to Mixed Media Artwork
    A lesson with Doris Charest Studio
    View lesson

    In this lesson, get an introduction to mixed media artwork. Start with a review of the materials used, then glance over the history of the art form.

    In this lesson, get an introduction to mixed media artwork. Start with a review of the materials used, then glance over the history of the art form.

  • 3 min
    Personal Growth lesson
    Playing
    2 CQ
    How to Turn Ideas Into Action
    A lesson with Vladimir Raykov
    View lesson

    Reading should be one of your daily habits that can help you process information, and generate ideas. In this lesson, learn to put your ideas into action!

    Reading should be one of your daily habits that can help you process information, and generate ideas. In this lesson, learn to put your ideas into action!

Curios

  • FREE
    Art Appreciation Art Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    "Portrait of Suzanne Bloch" by Pablo Picasso
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    Created: 1904
    Medium: oil on canvas
    Dimensions: 21.3 x 25.6 in (54 x 65 cm)
    Current location: São Paulo Museum of Art, São Paulo
     
    Suzanne Bloch is not impressed. Last week, we heard the story of how the Mona Lisa went missing for two years in the early 20th century. Today, we take a look at the victim of a much more recent theft. The Portrait of Suzanne Bloch, one of Pablo Picasso’s iconic Blue Period portraits, was stolen a mere nine years ago this week from the São Paulo Museum of Art. That robbery, though, was caught on security cameras, and the painting was recovered undamaged less than three weeks later. The uninterested-looking subject is Suzanne Bloch, a Wagnerian opera singer who ran in Picasso’s social circle. We may never know how closely this portrait matched Bloch’s actual temperament, because as in other Blue Period paintings, the somber mood and blue hues reflected the painter’s own melancholy following a friend’s suicide. These made them a harder sell at the time, but today, Portrait of Suzanne Bloch is valued at over $50 million. Now that’s a fact bound to have made both Bloch and Picasso smile.

    with

    Created: 1904
    Medium: oil on canvas
    Dimensions: 21.3 x 25.6 in (54 x 65 cm)
    Current location: São Paulo Museum of Art, São Paulo
     
    Suzanne Bloch is not impressed. Last week, we heard the story of how the Mona Lisa went missing for two years in the early 20th century. Today, we take a look at the victim of a much more recent theft. The Portrait of Suzanne Bloch, one of Pablo Picasso’s iconic Blue Period portraits, was stolen a mere nine years ago this week from the São Paulo Museum of Art. That robbery, though, was caught on security cameras, and the painting was recovered undamaged less than three weeks later. The uninterested-looking subject is Suzanne Bloch, a Wagnerian opera singer who ran in Picasso’s social circle. We may never know how closely this portrait matched Bloch’s actual temperament, because as in other Blue Period paintings, the somber mood and blue hues reflected the painter’s own melancholy following a friend’s suicide. These made them a harder sell at the time, but today, Portrait of Suzanne Bloch is valued at over $50 million. Now that’s a fact bound to have made both Bloch and Picasso smile.

  • FREE
    Art Appreciation Art Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Young Picasso's breakthrough
    A curio with
    View curio

    Title: Woman at the Theater

    Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
    Created: 1901
    Medium: oil on canvas
    Dimensions: 31.9 x 23.6 in (80 x 60 cm)
    Current location: Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel, Switzerland
     

    Grow up and be an artist? Pablo Picasso didn't have to wait that long. The art prodigy had his first major exhibit on Paris' famous rue Lafitte, known for its prestigious art galleries, this day in 1901. At the young age of 19, the Spanish-born Picasso was taking in the Parisian night life and artistic influences from the region, culminating in works like Woman at the Theater. While this may not be a painting from the cubist Picasso we're used to, elements of the artist who was dying to break out of his formal training are visible. The woman's face bears some of the flat perspective Picasso was so fond of, and the lower half of the painting dissolves into an abstraction of colors and space where it's hard to tell where the woman's dress ends, and the room begins. Though all of the primary colors shine in Woman at the Theater, Picasso would soon narrow his palette to just one for his Blue Period (1901-1904), to match the somber mood he felt after the suicide of a good friend. Even prodigies aren't immune to the plight of the tortured artist!

     

    with

    Title: Woman at the Theater

    Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
    Created: 1901
    Medium: oil on canvas
    Dimensions: 31.9 x 23.6 in (80 x 60 cm)
    Current location: Kunstmuseum Basel, Basel, Switzerland
     

    Grow up and be an artist? Pablo Picasso didn't have to wait that long. The art prodigy had his first major exhibit on Paris' famous rue Lafitte, known for its prestigious art galleries, this day in 1901. At the young age of 19, the Spanish-born Picasso was taking in the Parisian night life and artistic influences from the region, culminating in works like Woman at the Theater. While this may not be a painting from the cubist Picasso we're used to, elements of the artist who was dying to break out of his formal training are visible. The woman's face bears some of the flat perspective Picasso was so fond of, and the lower half of the painting dissolves into an abstraction of colors and space where it's hard to tell where the woman's dress ends, and the room begins. Though all of the primary colors shine in Woman at the Theater, Picasso would soon narrow his palette to just one for his Blue Period (1901-1904), to match the somber mood he felt after the suicide of a good friend. Even prodigies aren't immune to the plight of the tortured artist!

     

  • FREE
    Aesthetic Art Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Picasso's secrets
    A curio with
    View curio

    Title: The Blue Room
    Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
    Created: 1901
    Medium: oil on canvas
    Dimensions: 21 x 24 in (50 x 61 cm)
    Current location: The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.
     

    Picasso certainly had a few things hidden up his sleeve. In the aftermath of a friend's death, the artist, born this day in 1881, started painting solely in blue and green hues to creatively express his loss. Known as his Blue Period, this era also included several depictions of women like the above work, where one bathes alone in the privacy of her apartment, her face made blank to indicate her anonymity. The intimate moment holds a secret of its own; struggling to make ends meet this early in his career, Picasso often painted over works he hadn't been able to sell. When conservators placed this painting under X-rays, they found underneath a portrait of a pensive man sitting in an armchair. To the naked eye, a few brushstrokes towards the top of the painting protrude through the layers of paint give away the fact that there's something below. When the figure was discovered in 2014, it stirred speculation in the art world about who this particular man might be, in his fancy dress coat and bow tie. That secret may be one that we won't be able to unearth!
     

    Below: the figure revealed by infrared x-ray technology.

     

     

     

    with

    Title: The Blue Room
    Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
    Created: 1901
    Medium: oil on canvas
    Dimensions: 21 x 24 in (50 x 61 cm)
    Current location: The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C.
     

    Picasso certainly had a few things hidden up his sleeve. In the aftermath of a friend's death, the artist, born this day in 1881, started painting solely in blue and green hues to creatively express his loss. Known as his Blue Period, this era also included several depictions of women like the above work, where one bathes alone in the privacy of her apartment, her face made blank to indicate her anonymity. The intimate moment holds a secret of its own; struggling to make ends meet this early in his career, Picasso often painted over works he hadn't been able to sell. When conservators placed this painting under X-rays, they found underneath a portrait of a pensive man sitting in an armchair. To the naked eye, a few brushstrokes towards the top of the painting protrude through the layers of paint give away the fact that there's something below. When the figure was discovered in 2014, it stirred speculation in the art world about who this particular man might be, in his fancy dress coat and bow tie. That secret may be one that we won't be able to unearth!
     

    Below: the figure revealed by infrared x-ray technology.

     

     

     

  • FREE
    Composition Photo Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    A pic of Picasso
    A curio with
    View curio

    D'aww. Does it get any cuter than this father and son playing it up in the sun? Between his harrowing forays into combat, famous wartime photographer Robert Capa spent his time in the company of illustrious friends, like painter Pablo Picasso. Shown above is a photo he took of the artist and his adorable son, Claude, at a seaside resort on France’s Côte d’Azur in 1948. Claude was the child of Picasso and one of his mistresses, Françoise Gilot, who was 40 years his junior. By the time this wholesome photo was taken, Capa had already documented the Spanish Civil War and stormed Omaha Beach alongside soldiers on D-Day. Due to his unrivaled reputation as a war journalist, and his publicized relationship with Gerda Taro—an equally fearless photographer—his talent for bubbly candids has otherwise been forgotten. And with friends like Ernest Hemingway, Henri Matisse, and others, it's a real shame. Though Capa would die an untimely death on May 25, 1954, in French Indochina, both his heartwarming portraits and his grisly war scenes live on as testaments to the many merits and detriments of humankind.
     

    Below: a boxer with his son at the legendary Stillman's Gym, New York (1937); a student acting in a propaganda play, Hankou, China (1938); and Ernest Hemingway like we've never seen him before (1944).
     

     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Cornell Capa / Robert Capa / International Center of Photography / Magnum Photos.
     

    with

    D'aww. Does it get any cuter than this father and son playing it up in the sun? Between his harrowing forays into combat, famous wartime photographer Robert Capa spent his time in the company of illustrious friends, like painter Pablo Picasso. Shown above is a photo he took of the artist and his adorable son, Claude, at a seaside resort on France’s Côte d’Azur in 1948. Claude was the child of Picasso and one of his mistresses, Françoise Gilot, who was 40 years his junior. By the time this wholesome photo was taken, Capa had already documented the Spanish Civil War and stormed Omaha Beach alongside soldiers on D-Day. Due to his unrivaled reputation as a war journalist, and his publicized relationship with Gerda Taro—an equally fearless photographer—his talent for bubbly candids has otherwise been forgotten. And with friends like Ernest Hemingway, Henri Matisse, and others, it's a real shame. Though Capa would die an untimely death on May 25, 1954, in French Indochina, both his heartwarming portraits and his grisly war scenes live on as testaments to the many merits and detriments of humankind.
     

    Below: a boxer with his son at the legendary Stillman's Gym, New York (1937); a student acting in a propaganda play, Hankou, China (1938); and Ernest Hemingway like we've never seen him before (1944).
     

     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Cornell Capa / Robert Capa / International Center of Photography / Magnum Photos.
     

  • FREE
    Art Appreciation Photo Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    Picasso's muse behind the lens
    A curio with
    View curio

    What does a baby armadillo become when viewed through the surrealist lens of Dora Maar? The one in this photo, titled Père Ubu, was meant to embody the bestial nature of the royal anti-hero in Alfred Jarry's satirically absurd play, Ubu Roi. Maar's strange, imaginative work was partly an homage to her avant-garde contemporaries who were pushing the boundaries of art, reality, and good taste in the early part of the 20th century. The artist, born on this day 110 years ago, was an established photographer and painter in France when she became a colleague and occasional muse for artists and intellectuals like Man Ray, Georges Bataille, and most notably, Pablo Picasso. Unfortunately, Maar abandoned her interest in armadillo portraits and other creative endeavors as her relationship with the cubist painter grew (Picasso was notoriously unkind in his artistic assessment of photographers). In later parts of her career, she only brought out her camera on rare occasions—like when she documented Picasso's painting of the Spanish Civil War mural Guernica in a series of black and white photos. When the two broke up in 1946, Maar became reclusive, rarely making images anymore. What remains of her artistic outpouring is sometimes shocking, often dreamy, and always captivating.

     

    Below: Maar capturing Picasso's Guernica process, Double Portrait, Paris, and a portrait of Maar by Man Ray.
     

     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Dora Maar, Museum of Modern Art / Artist's Rights Society
     

    with

    What does a baby armadillo become when viewed through the surrealist lens of Dora Maar? The one in this photo, titled Père Ubu, was meant to embody the bestial nature of the royal anti-hero in Alfred Jarry's satirically absurd play, Ubu Roi. Maar's strange, imaginative work was partly an homage to her avant-garde contemporaries who were pushing the boundaries of art, reality, and good taste in the early part of the 20th century. The artist, born on this day 110 years ago, was an established photographer and painter in France when she became a colleague and occasional muse for artists and intellectuals like Man Ray, Georges Bataille, and most notably, Pablo Picasso. Unfortunately, Maar abandoned her interest in armadillo portraits and other creative endeavors as her relationship with the cubist painter grew (Picasso was notoriously unkind in his artistic assessment of photographers). In later parts of her career, she only brought out her camera on rare occasions—like when she documented Picasso's painting of the Spanish Civil War mural Guernica in a series of black and white photos. When the two broke up in 1946, Maar became reclusive, rarely making images anymore. What remains of her artistic outpouring is sometimes shocking, often dreamy, and always captivating.

     

    Below: Maar capturing Picasso's Guernica process, Double Portrait, Paris, and a portrait of Maar by Man Ray.
     

     

     

     

    Image credit & copyright: Dora Maar, Museum of Modern Art / Artist's Rights Society
     

  • FREE
    Art Appreciation Art Curio
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    Free
    1 CQ
    Picasso for a new age
    A curio with
    View curio

    Title: Seated Woman 2017
    Artist: Omar Aqil
    Created: 2017
    Medium: Cinema 4D-Vray, Photoshop, Illustrator
     
    Pablo Picasso, meet the 21st century. The pioneering painter's cubist figures get a modern 3D makeover in Omar Aqil's series, MIMIC. Aqil, a Pakistan-based art director and digital artist, wanted to rethink how Picasso's abstract forms could interact with one another. Seated Woman 2017, as the title suggests, is inspired by Picasso's warm-hued 1930 painting of the same name (pictured below). The original is geometric and spatially ambiguous; Aqil's version distinguishes itself with rounded, sharp-edged, and distinctively layered shapes. We'd be totally convinced this composition was created from real props, were it not for the chair on the left—notice how it appears to recede in an unnatural way, almost as if flat. That's because Aqil, bringing Picasso's works fully into the modern era, rendered all the MIMIC images digitally using Cinema 4D-Vray, Photoshop, and Illustrator. We love his whimsical take on the classic images, and think Picasso would have also approved. He is, after all, credited with the mantra: "Good artists copy, great artists steal."

     
    Below: Pablo Picasso's Seated Woman, 1930.
     

     
    Below: a few more of Aqil's MIMC creations next to Picasso's originals.
     

     

     

     
    Image credit & copyright: Omar Aqil
     

    with

    Title: Seated Woman 2017
    Artist: Omar Aqil
    Created: 2017
    Medium: Cinema 4D-Vray, Photoshop, Illustrator
     
    Pablo Picasso, meet the 21st century. The pioneering painter's cubist figures get a modern 3D makeover in Omar Aqil's series, MIMIC. Aqil, a Pakistan-based art director and digital artist, wanted to rethink how Picasso's abstract forms could interact with one another. Seated Woman 2017, as the title suggests, is inspired by Picasso's warm-hued 1930 painting of the same name (pictured below). The original is geometric and spatially ambiguous; Aqil's version distinguishes itself with rounded, sharp-edged, and distinctively layered shapes. We'd be totally convinced this composition was created from real props, were it not for the chair on the left—notice how it appears to recede in an unnatural way, almost as if flat. That's because Aqil, bringing Picasso's works fully into the modern era, rendered all the MIMIC images digitally using Cinema 4D-Vray, Photoshop, and Illustrator. We love his whimsical take on the classic images, and think Picasso would have also approved. He is, after all, credited with the mantra: "Good artists copy, great artists steal."

     
    Below: Pablo Picasso's Seated Woman, 1930.
     

     
    Below: a few more of Aqil's MIMC creations next to Picasso's originals.
     

     

     

     
    Image credit & copyright: Omar Aqil
     

  • FREE
    Art Appreciation Art Curio
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    FLASHBACK | Picasso for a new age
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    It's Flashback Friday! Enjoy this favorite from the Curio Cabinet archives.
     

    Title: Seated Woman 2017
    Artist: Omar Aqil
    Created: 2017
    Medium: Cinema 4D-Vray, Photoshop, Illustrator
     
    Pablo Picasso, meet the 21st century. The pioneering painter's cubist figures get a modern 3D makeover in Omar Aqil's series, MIMIC. Aqil, a Pakistan-based art director and digital artist, wanted to rethink how Picasso's abstract forms could interact with one another. Seated Woman 2017, as the title suggests, is inspired by Picasso's warm-hued 1930 painting of the same name (pictured below). The original is geometric and spatially ambiguous; Aqil's version distinguishes itself with rounded, sharp-edged, and distinctively layered shapes. We'd be totally convinced this composition was created from real props, were it not for the chair on the left—notice how it appears to recede in an unnatural way, almost as if flat. That's because Aqil, bringing Picasso's works fully into the modern era, rendered all the MIMIC images digitally using Cinema 4D-Vray, Photoshop, and Illustrator. We love his whimsical take on the classic images, and think Picasso would have also approved. He is, after all, credited with the mantra: "Good artists copy, great artists steal."

     
    Below: Pablo Picasso's Seated Woman, 1930.
     

     
    Below: a few more of Aqil's MIMC creations next to Picasso's originals.
     

     

     

     
    Image credit & copyright: Omar Aqil
     

    with

    It's Flashback Friday! Enjoy this favorite from the Curio Cabinet archives.
     

    Title: Seated Woman 2017
    Artist: Omar Aqil
    Created: 2017
    Medium: Cinema 4D-Vray, Photoshop, Illustrator
     
    Pablo Picasso, meet the 21st century. The pioneering painter's cubist figures get a modern 3D makeover in Omar Aqil's series, MIMIC. Aqil, a Pakistan-based art director and digital artist, wanted to rethink how Picasso's abstract forms could interact with one another. Seated Woman 2017, as the title suggests, is inspired by Picasso's warm-hued 1930 painting of the same name (pictured below). The original is geometric and spatially ambiguous; Aqil's version distinguishes itself with rounded, sharp-edged, and distinctively layered shapes. We'd be totally convinced this composition was created from real props, were it not for the chair on the left—notice how it appears to recede in an unnatural way, almost as if flat. That's because Aqil, bringing Picasso's works fully into the modern era, rendered all the MIMIC images digitally using Cinema 4D-Vray, Photoshop, and Illustrator. We love his whimsical take on the classic images, and think Picasso would have also approved. He is, after all, credited with the mantra: "Good artists copy, great artists steal."

     
    Below: Pablo Picasso's Seated Woman, 1930.
     

     
    Below: a few more of Aqil's MIMC creations next to Picasso's originals.
     

     

     

     
    Image credit & copyright: Omar Aqil
     

  • FREE
    Aesthetic Art Curio
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    FLASHBACK | Bulls on parade
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    It's Flashback Friday! Enjoy this animal-themed favorite from the Curio Cabinet archives.
     

    Title: The Bull (series)
    Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
    Created: 1945-1946
    Medium: lithograph
     
    Less is more. In the winter of 1945-1946, Picasso created this series of 11 lithographs, or prints pulled from a smooth stone, as an experiment in whittling down a subject to its true essence. The series starts with a realistic sketch of a bull, perhaps an homage to the artist's Spanish heritage. In the two subsequent images, the artist retains some of the realism but starts to experiment with proportion, as well as articulation of the bull's muscles and skeleton. From there, the images become gradually more abstracted and minimal, until we are left with a curved outline that still clearly reads as a bull. The series showcases Picasso's masterful ability to grasp the underlying elements of what he's rendering, and also provides context to the styles he pioneered. Though the images were created over seven decades ago, they continue to serve as inspiration for one of today's most ubiquitous brands. Apple uses Picasso's series to teach employees to mold product designs down to their simplest, most elegant forms. To "think different," even innovators must sometimes look to the past.

    with

    It's Flashback Friday! Enjoy this animal-themed favorite from the Curio Cabinet archives.
     

    Title: The Bull (series)
    Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
    Created: 1945-1946
    Medium: lithograph
     
    Less is more. In the winter of 1945-1946, Picasso created this series of 11 lithographs, or prints pulled from a smooth stone, as an experiment in whittling down a subject to its true essence. The series starts with a realistic sketch of a bull, perhaps an homage to the artist's Spanish heritage. In the two subsequent images, the artist retains some of the realism but starts to experiment with proportion, as well as articulation of the bull's muscles and skeleton. From there, the images become gradually more abstracted and minimal, until we are left with a curved outline that still clearly reads as a bull. The series showcases Picasso's masterful ability to grasp the underlying elements of what he's rendering, and also provides context to the styles he pioneered. Though the images were created over seven decades ago, they continue to serve as inspiration for one of today's most ubiquitous brands. Apple uses Picasso's series to teach employees to mold product designs down to their simplest, most elegant forms. To "think different," even innovators must sometimes look to the past.

  • FREE
    Art Appreciation Art Curio
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    Bulls on parade
    A curio with
    View curio

    Title: The Bull (series)
    Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
    Created: 1945-1946
    Medium: lithograph
     
    Less is more. In the winter of 1945-1946, Picasso created this series of 11 lithographs, or prints pulled from a smooth stone, as an experiment in whittling down a subject to its true essence. The series starts with a realistic sketch of a bull, perhaps an homage to the artist's Spanish heritage. In the two subsequent images, the artist retains some of the realism but starts to experiment with proportion, as well as articulation of the bull's muscles and skeleton. From there, the images become gradually more abstracted and minimal, until we are left with a curved outline that still clearly reads as a bull. The series showcases Picasso's masterful ability to grasp the underlying elements of what he's rendering, and also provides context to the styles he pioneered. Though the images were created over seven decades ago, they continue to serve as inspiration for one of today's most ubiquitous brands. Apple uses Picasso's series to teach employees to mold product designs down to their simplest, most elegant forms. To "think different," even innovators must sometimes look to the past.

    with

    Title: The Bull (series)
    Artist: Pablo Picasso (1881-1973)
    Created: 1945-1946
    Medium: lithograph
     
    Less is more. In the winter of 1945-1946, Picasso created this series of 11 lithographs, or prints pulled from a smooth stone, as an experiment in whittling down a subject to its true essence. The series starts with a realistic sketch of a bull, perhaps an homage to the artist's Spanish heritage. In the two subsequent images, the artist retains some of the realism but starts to experiment with proportion, as well as articulation of the bull's muscles and skeleton. From there, the images become gradually more abstracted and minimal, until we are left with a curved outline that still clearly reads as a bull. The series showcases Picasso's masterful ability to grasp the underlying elements of what he's rendering, and also provides context to the styles he pioneered. Though the images were created over seven decades ago, they continue to serve as inspiration for one of today's most ubiquitous brands. Apple uses Picasso's series to teach employees to mold product designs down to their simplest, most elegant forms. To "think different," even innovators must sometimes look to the past.

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