26 matching results

  • 18
    270 min
    18-part Violin course
    Playing
    145 CQ
    Fiddle for Absolute Beginners
    A 18-part course with Pete Martin
    View course

    This course prepares total beginners to hit the stage with a repertoire of no less than 11 traditional fiddle songs, and the ability to play and improvise with other musicians. Anyone can fiddle!

    This course prepares total beginners to hit the stage with a repertoire of no less than 11 traditional fiddle songs, and the ability to play and improvise with other musicians. Anyone can fiddle!

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Lessons Sort By views

  • 16 min
    FREE
    Music Theory lesson
    Playing
    Free
    9 CQ
    Terms & Vocab for the Fiddle
    A lesson with Pete Martin
    View lesson

    Learn basic vocabulary for the violin or fiddle (same thing), and get more comfortable with this challenging instrument, both physically and musically.

    Learn basic vocabulary for the violin or fiddle (same thing), and get more comfortable with this challenging instrument, both physically and musically.

  • 17 min
    Music Theory lesson
    Playing
    9 CQ
    Learning to Play Fiddle by Ear
    A lesson with Pete Martin
    View lesson

    Fiddling is playing by ear, so learning songs by ear is very important. This lesson demonstrates a step-by-step method for learning fiddle songs by ear.

    Fiddling is playing by ear, so learning songs by ear is very important. This lesson demonstrates a step-by-step method for learning fiddle songs by ear.

  • 16 min
    Violin lesson
    Playing
    9 CQ
    How to Hold a Fiddle Bow
    A lesson with Pete Martin
    View lesson

    This lesson introduces a step-by-step method for how to hold the bow for good control and improved sound on the fiddle. Plus, learn common mistakes to avoid.

    This lesson introduces a step-by-step method for how to hold the bow for good control and improved sound on the fiddle. Plus, learn common mistakes to avoid.

  • 18 min
    Violin lesson
    Playing
    10 CQ
    Right Arm/Hand Fiddle Mechanics
    A lesson with Pete Martin
    View lesson

    The bow is the hardest thing to control for beginning fiddlers. This lesson breaks down the technique of the right bow arm and hand into small sections.

    The bow is the hardest thing to control for beginning fiddlers. This lesson breaks down the technique of the right bow arm and hand into small sections.

  • 18 min
    Violin lesson
    Playing
    10 CQ
    How to Hold a Fiddle
    A lesson with Pete Martin
    View lesson

    Learn good ergonomic methods for holding the fiddle. Knowing how to hold a fiddle correctly makes a huge difference in the comfort level for the player.

    Learn good ergonomic methods for holding the fiddle. Knowing how to hold a fiddle correctly makes a huge difference in the comfort level for the player.

  • 16 min
    Viola lesson
    Playing
    9 CQ
    Fiddle Song | Boil the Cabbage Down
    A lesson with Pete Martin
    View lesson

    Now that you’ve learned good fiddle form, attempt your first fiddle song! “Boil the Cabbage Down” is often the first tune beginning fiddlers learn.

    Now that you’ve learned good fiddle form, attempt your first fiddle song! “Boil the Cabbage Down” is often the first tune beginning fiddlers learn.

  • 19 min
    Violin lesson
    Playing
    10 CQ
    Left Arm/Hand Fiddle Mechanics
    A lesson with Pete Martin
    View lesson

    This lesson demonstrates good ergonomics for playing the fiddle with the left arm and hand. These positions allow for comfortable playing with a good sound.

    This lesson demonstrates good ergonomics for playing the fiddle with the left arm and hand. These positions allow for comfortable playing with a good sound.

  • 24 min
    Music Theory lesson
    Playing
    13 CQ
    How to Tune a Fiddle
    A lesson with Pete Martin
    View lesson

    Proper tuning is vital for getting the best sound out of your instrument. Learn how to tune a fiddle before you play, for the best results possible.

    Proper tuning is vital for getting the best sound out of your instrument. Learn how to tune a fiddle before you play, for the best results possible.

  • 9 min
    Viola lesson
    Playing
    5 CQ
    Fiddle Song | Cripple Creek
    A lesson with Pete Martin
    View lesson

    Learn to play “Cripple Creek,” a popular, easy fiddle song that will introduce new notes and reinforce the fiddle techniques covered in this course.

    Learn to play “Cripple Creek,” a popular, easy fiddle song that will introduce new notes and reinforce the fiddle techniques covered in this course.

Curios

  • FREE
    Aesthetic Art Curio
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    The sounds of scary
    A curio with
    View curio

    Title: The Apprehension Engine

    Artist: Tony Duggan-Smith
    Created: 2016
    Medium: scrap materials from various musical instruments
    Current location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
     

    This is the kind of instrument that makes things go bump in the night. Film composer Mark Korven (The Witch) recently commissioned his friend and luthier (stringed-instrument maker) Tony Duggan-Smith to make an instrument strictly for scoring horror films. To bring a new level of fright to his compositions, Korven wanted to distance himself from the predictability of using synthesizers or traditional orchestra instruments. What followed was truly a Frankenstein-like effort as Duggan-Smith gathered bits and bobbles from his workshop, and patched them together to make the Apprehension Engine. The body of the instrument is composed of a reverb tank, a hurdy-gurdy wheel and strings-fiddle, an electric battery-powered bow, and steel rulers to grate the ears. The sounds of Korven bowing, plucking, or hitting different parts of the instrument range from creepy to downright unsettling, but they're perfect for a night of double creature features.

     
    Below: the Apprehension Engine in action!
     

     
    Image credit & copyright: CBC Radio
     

    with

    Title: The Apprehension Engine

    Artist: Tony Duggan-Smith
    Created: 2016
    Medium: scrap materials from various musical instruments
    Current location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
     

    This is the kind of instrument that makes things go bump in the night. Film composer Mark Korven (The Witch) recently commissioned his friend and luthier (stringed-instrument maker) Tony Duggan-Smith to make an instrument strictly for scoring horror films. To bring a new level of fright to his compositions, Korven wanted to distance himself from the predictability of using synthesizers or traditional orchestra instruments. What followed was truly a Frankenstein-like effort as Duggan-Smith gathered bits and bobbles from his workshop, and patched them together to make the Apprehension Engine. The body of the instrument is composed of a reverb tank, a hurdy-gurdy wheel and strings-fiddle, an electric battery-powered bow, and steel rulers to grate the ears. The sounds of Korven bowing, plucking, or hitting different parts of the instrument range from creepy to downright unsettling, but they're perfect for a night of double creature features.

     
    Below: the Apprehension Engine in action!
     

     
    Image credit & copyright: CBC Radio
     

  • FREE
    Work Daily Curio #1335
    Playing
    Free
    1 CQ
    History's first hacker attack
    A curio with
    View curio

    Hacking has been around longer than you think. Long before Wikileaks and Russian-hacked email servers and phishing attacks, the term "hacking" described fiddling with electronics or radios in ways not prescribed by the instructions. The first documented use of the term was in the minutes of a 1955 meeting of the MIT Tech Model Railroad Club: "anyone working or hacking on the electrical system, turn the power off to avoid fuse blowing."
     
    But the idea of breaking into technological systems dates back much further. In 1903, a demonstration of Guglielmo Marconi's "wireless" (telegraph) machine was hacked by a competitor. Marconi, who essentially invented radio and won the 1909 Nobel Prize in Physics, was demonstrating his new telegraph machine at London's Royal Institution. The physicist John Fleming was on stage, about to receive a Morse code message sent by Marconi himself—from a clifftop station in Cornwall, 300 miles away. Before Fleming could begin his demonstration, as if by magic, the telegraph machine started tapping out a message in Morse code. It said: "'Rats rats rats rats, there was a young fellow of Italy, who diddled the public quite prettily." Marconi's telegraph had been hacked! The man behind the mischief was Nevil Maskelyne, a London magician hired by Marconi's rival the Eastern Telegraph Company, to thwart the demonstration. Maskelyne had placed receivers throughout London which allowed him to intercept Marconi's transmissions without knowing their frequency. The company and Maskelyne later said they were simply alerting the public to Marconi's false claims that telegraphs were completely private. Hmm, haven't I heard this somewhere before? A publicity stunt that exposes other people's private information and threatens national security, performed by a supposedly humble public servant. Who knew Assange was just a modern day Maskelyne?

    with

    Hacking has been around longer than you think. Long before Wikileaks and Russian-hacked email servers and phishing attacks, the term "hacking" described fiddling with electronics or radios in ways not prescribed by the instructions. The first documented use of the term was in the minutes of a 1955 meeting of the MIT Tech Model Railroad Club: "anyone working or hacking on the electrical system, turn the power off to avoid fuse blowing."
     
    But the idea of breaking into technological systems dates back much further. In 1903, a demonstration of Guglielmo Marconi's "wireless" (telegraph) machine was hacked by a competitor. Marconi, who essentially invented radio and won the 1909 Nobel Prize in Physics, was demonstrating his new telegraph machine at London's Royal Institution. The physicist John Fleming was on stage, about to receive a Morse code message sent by Marconi himself—from a clifftop station in Cornwall, 300 miles away. Before Fleming could begin his demonstration, as if by magic, the telegraph machine started tapping out a message in Morse code. It said: "'Rats rats rats rats, there was a young fellow of Italy, who diddled the public quite prettily." Marconi's telegraph had been hacked! The man behind the mischief was Nevil Maskelyne, a London magician hired by Marconi's rival the Eastern Telegraph Company, to thwart the demonstration. Maskelyne had placed receivers throughout London which allowed him to intercept Marconi's transmissions without knowing their frequency. The company and Maskelyne later said they were simply alerting the public to Marconi's false claims that telegraphs were completely private. Hmm, haven't I heard this somewhere before? A publicity stunt that exposes other people's private information and threatens national security, performed by a supposedly humble public servant. Who knew Assange was just a modern day Maskelyne?

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