Myles Power
Myles Power

Hi, my name is Myles Power, I am originally from Middlesbrough in the north east of England. I have been called a geek by nearly every one I have ever met, including my mother! It probably has something to do with my favourite TV show being Star Trek Enterprise, playing several instruments (but most skilled on the saxophone), and owning multiple sonic screwdrivers. I have always had an interest in science from a young age, I was able to continue this interest by studying Chemistry at University. Whilst at university, I specialised in organic synthesis and also gained an appreciation of Biological Chemistry. I want to share my love of science online by producing home experiment videos in the hope of encouraging the next generation of scientist to try them for themselves.

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All Lessons by Myles Power
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As a child, you may have looked at your family and wondered if you were adopted; more than likely, this was not the case. But had you been able to determine your blood type at home, all concerns could have been quickly relieved. Years later, you finally have the chance to confirm your suspicions! Learn how to type your own blood at home using an agglutination assay. While we may be able to help clear up any lingering childhood doubts, we can’t do anything about your family…

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Does DNA sometimes seem imaginary, like the Tooth Fairy? Everyone learns about it in high school biology, but have you ever actually seen DNA? Well, with Myles Power’s help you can. In this lesson, learn how to extract DNA from a strawberry. Using only common household items like dish soap, table salt, and paper towels, you too can draw out the genetic material that makes a strawberry a strawberry. This experiment is easy, but amazing, and proves that science is totally fun.

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Use science to topple a whole industry from the comfort of your home! With these two simple experiments using household items (well, also pipettes and homeopathic acid), debunk myths and attain supreme know-it-all status by proving homeopathy wrong. See how nitric acid should react with copper (ie: explosively), and then compare it with homeopathic nitric acid's reaction. Also, create a homemade pH indicator from cabbage and hot water and test the homeopathic acid yourself.

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Chili peppers often appear in salsas and other dishes, and add a heat that you might love or hate. But do you know why chili peppers are hot? After all, they are a fruit—what could be the evolutionary benefit of making someone blush and sweat, or setting their heart racing? In this chemistry lesson, learn about the varying heat levels of peppers, the chemical reactions behind the hot and painful sensations they produce, and why high levels of heat can mean protection for a pepper plant.

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During WWII, Germany sent unmanned “Doodlebug” aircrafts into England to carry out deadly air raids. Very technologically advanced at the time, this same jet engine can be replicated with far less deadly results in your own home. Learn about the chemical reactions that propelled the V-1, while enjoying the knowledge that this experiment takes place in a jam jar, and if done right, is quite safe. This chemistry experiment requires a jar, ethanol, a match and an adult to supervise.

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Anyone who has ever received a counterfeit artifact knows the disappointment and anger the deception can produce. So channel that disappointment and anger into destroying the fake, by altering its chemical composition forever! In this lesson, Myles Power destroys a fake aluminum Star Trek badge with the element gallium; learn how this element can diffuse into aluminum to create a weak alloy before witnessing the damage that Gallium can do after just a day, or three months time.

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Indulge your inner mad scientist by experimenting with and creating shapes out of magnets and ferrofluid, a black liquid present in the earth's crust. Discover the science behind this magnetic rare earth, hear how to make your own ferrofluid at home (including a portable version encased in water), learn how to alter and complicate your ferrofluid designs, and get tips on how to tidy up after your project (as every good mad scientist should).

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Keep your keys chained up with the threat of mutually assured destruction. Goofy scientist Myles Power shows off his radioactive keychain, and along the way explains how gaseous tritium, an isotope of hydrogen used to improve the explosive power of nuclear bombs, can serve as a light source through the power of radioluminscence. Warning: do not crack, swallow, or inhale!

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Looking for a great chemistry experiment to impress your friends? How about one in which an orange solution changes colors when you shake it, but always turns back orange? It’s quick, fun, colorful, and sure to grab attention. Learn how to do this color change chemistry experiment that requires only five ingredients and provides the perfect visual aid to explain the chemical processes of oxidation and reduction. Science is so fun!

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At -320.8°F (-196°C), liquid nitrogen is colder than the moon at night; scientists take extreme caution in handling it, knowing that coming into prolonged contact with the substance can result in irreparable damage. So why is Myles Powers willing to pour some on his bare hand? Find out how Myles uses the Leidenfrost effect to handle liquid nitrogen in this demonstration.

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